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A HISTORY OF THE RENCOUNTER AT DRUMCLOG AND BATTLE  AT BOTHWELL BRIDGE IN THE MONTH OF JUNE 1679 with folding engraved frontispiece, Aiton, William
1 Aiton, William A HISTORY OF THE RENCOUNTER AT DRUMCLOG AND BATTLE AT BOTHWELL BRIDGE IN THE MONTH OF JUNE 1679 with folding engraved frontispiece
Hamilton W. D. Borthwick and Co. 1821 First Edition Hardcover Good 8vo 8" - 9" tall 
131 pages; With an account of what is correct, and What is Fictitious in the Tales of my Landlord, respecting these engagements, and Reflections on Politcal Subjects . OCLC: 6386611 The Battle of Drumclog is celebrated by some in Scotland as a victory for religious freedom over the oppressive policies of the contemporary government. Folding frontispiece plate and text block clean and tightly stitched, front board detached, backstrip and ffep lacking. Excellent candidate for rebacking. ; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
Price: 149.94 USD
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THE LIFE OF JEFFERSON DAVIS, Alfriend, Frank H.
2 Alfriend, Frank H. THE LIFE OF JEFFERSON DAVIS
Cincinnati Caxton Publishing House 1868 First Edition Hardcover Good 8vo 8" - 9" tall 
xvii, [13]-645 pages; Contents unmarked and secure in original brown cloth binding, scattered foxing, cloth chipped at spine ends and edges and repaired tear at center of spine. Frontispiece portrait of Jefferson Davis with toned tissue guard. OCLC: 1919679 An imperfect, but complete first edition of this fascinating biography of Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America. The author Frank Heath Alfriend (1841-1887) was an author, newspaper reporter, and teacher. Alfriend became the editor of The Southern Messenger in 1864. He varied the format somewhat and contributed a significant amount of writing to it during the following months, including much on the War. At the time of his death in 1887, he was assistant librarian for the US Senate. Alfriend is primarily remembered as a friend and and sympathetic biographer of Jefferson Davis. In a letter from Davis to Alfriend, he expresses his gratitude for the author's efforts to present an accurate record of his life and for pleading his case with the public. 
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3 Alvin, Colonel ; et Commandant Andre Les Canons de la Victoire -- Septieme Edition du Manuel d'Artillerie Lourde Revue et Considerablement Augmentee
Paris Charles LaVauzelle & Cie. 1923 Hardcover Very Good 8vo 
ix, (1), 572 pages; Preface de M. Le Marchal Joffre. Avec 422 croquis et figures dans le texte. OCLC 458462719 Original owner's name on ffep - Major Anderegg [of the Swiss Army], otherwise clean and tight in pulisher's green cloth binding with black lettering. Illustrated throughout with diagrams, charts and drawings. A foundational reference for artillerymen and officers written by Colonel Pierre Hippolyte Scipion Isidore Alvin and Commandant Felix d'Andre. In February 1914, then Captain Pierre Alvin published a detailed essay on the use of field artillery during the Balkan War in the Journal des Sciences Militaires. In the conclusion he speculates about the role of heavy artillery should a conflict arise between France and Germany, which it obviously did when World War I broke out. The treatise offered here reflects his accumulated experience, knowledge and research joined with that of Commandant Andre. Commandant Felix d' Andre, adjutant and A.D.C. to General Pau, was a distinguished soldier, a world traveller, and a writer on military tactics. In 1900 he was a member of the French military mission to Peru, where he served as sub-director, and later director- in-chief of all military instruction in that country. His career there was brilliant, resulting in Peru's admirable preparedness when the difficulties with Bolivia arose. In the Great War, Commandant Andre played a major role in the Battle of the Marne, for which he received the Cross of the Legion of Honour. He was captured after making an heroic defence at Ailly Wood for four days, and was confined in a German military prison for two years, being eventually released in an exchange of prisoners. 
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HISTORY OF BATTLE-FLAG DAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1879, Anonymous
4 Anonymous HISTORY OF BATTLE-FLAG DAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1879
Hartford Lockwood & Merritt 1879 First Edition Hardcover Very Good 8vo 
290 pages; Original owner's name on ffep (John Tweedy) and two pages noting James Brattle Burbank (first as Major in the Official Order of the Day for the Parade and later as General with the Twentieth Infantry). Otherwise the text is clean and tight in original royal blue cloth binding with gilt lettering at spine and gilt decoration (image of tattered U.S. and Connecticut flags) on front cover. Some wear at spine and corners, still a nice example of this scarce book. John Tweedy was the son-in-law of Brigadier General James Brattle Burbank, U.S.A., who was born in Hartford, Connecticut in 1838 and died at Walter Reed Hospital in 1928, a veteran of both the Civil War and the Spanish-American War. During the American Civil War, Burbank began his military service as First Lieutenant in the 20th Connecticut Volunteer Infantry in November 1862 and was promoted to Brevet Major by March 1863 for his gallant conduct in the battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia. He then resigned from the Volunteers and enlisted in the U.S. Army serving in the 3rd U. S. Artillery for the remainder of the War. In the 1880s and 1890s he was an officer with the 5th U.S. Artillery and later the Artillery Corps. The tattered flags that had flown over Connecticut's troops during the Civil War were preserved by the State originally in the Arsenal in 1865 and then transferred to special display cases in the Capitol on September 17, 1879 - Battle Flag Day. This book describes the history of the first Battle Flag Day in Connecticut with details of those that participated in and attended the ceremonies -- the finance committee, the gathering of the surviving veterans within their regimental organizations. There is a description of the decorations for the ceremonies from the Hartford Daily Times, a description of the preserved battle flags themselves, the history of the military actions that took place under those flags, the stories of the regiments and their men. The volume finishes with comments from the press, commemorative poetry and sermons and a description of Antietam and the role of Connecticut's troops in that battle. ; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
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Journal Historique Et Politique Des Principaux Événements Des Différentes Cours de L'Europe  including "Traite de paix entre l'Angleterre & les Caraïbes de l'isle Saint-Vincent", Anonymous
5 Anonymous Journal Historique Et Politique Des Principaux Événements Des Différentes Cours de L'Europe including "Traite de paix entre l'Angleterre & les Caraïbes de l'isle Saint-Vincent"
Genève [but probably Paris] Ch.- J. Panckoucke 1773 First Edition Hardcover Very Good 12mo 
On offer here is an attractive volume in 18th century full calf, bound in the French style, (flat spine with floral tools in gilt, red label lettered in gilt, marbled endpapers, edges decoratively stained red). The volume in which these interesting numbers of the now-scarce 'Journal Historique Et Politique Des Principaux Événements Des Différentes Cours de L'Europe' is in a handsome contemporary binding which shows only minor rubbing -- mostly along the hinges, apart from some moderate fraying and loss at the corners and erosion of the top cap of the spine, exposing the headband. The original swirl-marbled endpapers are intact and the inner hinges are tight and secure; the sewing is sound and tight throughout. There are scattered brown marks and paper flaws, reflecting the mediocre quality of the paper selected for this journal, which was hardly expected to last for 240 years. This volume contains issues 10-18 of the interesting periodical "Journal Historique Et Politique Des Principaux Événements Des Différentes Cours de L'Europe," covering events of April-June of 1773. This journal was published every 10 days for the active Parisian publisher and bookseller Charles-Joseph Panckoucke. One of the "différentes Cours de L'Europe" in which events were covered extensively was London, with pages of details of goings on in England and its colonies offered in each issue. There is an unusually detailed account, with full text (in French) of a significant treaty signed by a representative of King George III: "Traite de paix entre l'Angleterre & les Caraïbes de l'isle Saint-VIncent." This appears on pp. 45-48 of Numero 12 -- issued 30 Avril, 1773. The treaty is presented as having been agreed to on the 17th "de ces mois," and so it is very much in the category of breaking news. This treaty is now fairly (but undeservedly) obscure, but the situation it attempted to settle grew out of one famous treaty, from ten years before and it proved to be a fascinating precursor to another more famous treaty, signed ten years later. In one of the lesser re-assignments of the territories of the world effected by the 1763 Treaty of Paris at the conclusion of the Seven Years' War -- Britain was awarded the right to rule over the Caribbean island of Saint Vincent. The island's history, of course, is much older; native American Arawak and Carib tribes settled over several centuries on a number of islands in the Lesser Antilles including St.Vincent. The Arawaks arrived around 100AD, and the Caribs about a thousand years later. The Caribs, more organized and aggressive, subdued and absorbed the culture of the Arawaks. Shortly after the first British claim on Saint Vincent in 1627, two Dutch ships carrying captured Nigerians destined for slavery were shipwrecked in 1635 off the coast of St. Vincent. Some of the Africans were able to swim ashore and find shelter in the Carib villages. This population of Africans and their descendants was augmented over the years, including in 1675 when a ship carrying British settlers and their slaves was shipwrecked between St. Vincent and Bequia. Only the slaves survived the shipwreck and they also came to live and mix with the native mixed Carib-Arawak population. A certain number of escaped slaves from nearby Barbados, Grenada and St. Lucia also added to the African-Carib population. After some friction, and even wars, eventually the native Caribs and the newer African arrivals merged and blended their cultures. British settlers distinguished them as "Black Caribs" and "Red (or yellow) Caribs. The "Black" people so-designated by outsiders preferred to call themselves Garifuna. Throughout some of this period, there were French settlers who arrived with the intention of making their living as planters. They seemed to get along with the native population with less friction, but the British land owners seemed united in their desire to form large plantations and to run the Caribs off the most desireable land. They tried to buy the land, tried military action with the minor forces available, but the "Black" Caribs resisted both efforts. The British raised the stakes by sending Major General William Dalrymple, with troops borrowed from around the Caribbean and augmented by two regiments which were sent from North America (Dalrymple himself had been dispatched from Boston, where he had technically been in command of troops involved in the Boston Massacre, although he himself had not been present). Despite his best efforts, Dalrymple was unable to subdue the resisting Caribs, led by the now-legendary Chief Joseph Chatoyer -- who knew the windward side of the islands and the hills far better than any of their combantants. In February, opponents of the Government of Lord North raised objections in Parliament, and obtained votes which compelled the British Government to end the fighting and secure peace on the best terms possible. The French language text offered here appears to be a word for word version of the 24 articles of the English treaty published in the 'Saint Vincent Gazette' of 27 February 1773. One article, number VIII, is of extraordinary interest concerning Slavery and the trade (which would continue in the British possessions for nearly another sixty years). The heart of this article requires that Runaway Slaves in the possession of the Caribs are to be given up, that efforts must be made to discover and capture others, and it must be agreed that no future efforts to encourage, receive or harbour other slaves shall be made, under the penalty of fortiture of lands. Finally, it was stated that removal of Slaves from the Island constituted a Capital crime. The Caribs were required to pledge allegiance to King George III, but were made British subjects (which gave legal standing to enforce article VIII, of course). In return, the British ceded a well-defined portion of the Island to the Caribs -- (called the prettiest and most fertile part of the land by at least one subsequent scholar). Thus concluded the first Anglo-Carib War. This treaty did not endure for the ages... During three days in June of 1779, French ships fighting on behalf of the Revolutionaries in (North) America quickly took possession of Saint Vincent (with the assistance of Joseph Chatoyer and the "Black Caribs"). But in the Treaty of Versailles which was an ancillary treaty to the Treaty of Paris 1783 by which Britain also recognized the end of the American Revolutionary War saw the British restored as sovereigns over Saint Vincent. Relations between the British and their once-again subjects, the Caribs, disintegrated. The situation brought about a second Anglo-Carib war (1794-6), once again led by Joseph Chatoyer. As in the first war, the Caribs gave the British forces all they could manage for over a year, but after the death in battle of Chatoyer on March 14, 1795, the end seemed inevitable, although fighting raged throughout St. Vincent over the next year with both sides sustaining heavy losses. The final battle took place at Vigie on June 10th, 1796. After a night of arduous fighting the Caribs approached the British with a truce flag. The victorious British then did a remarkable thing, which has repercussions lasting throughout the Caribbean and extending to South and North America through the present time. They sorted the 5000 Caribs who surrendered, separating the darkest skinned individuals, and those with the most "African" features, from the "Yellow Caribs." This darkest majority of the so-called Black Caribs were first sent to Balliceaux in the Grenadines and then on to Bequia. Eventually, in 1797 the survivors were transported hundreds of miles to the island of Roatan off the Honduran coast in Central America. This extraordinary settlement has permanently affected the modern populations of Belize, Guatemala, Nicaragua, and Honduras. The 1773 treaty offered in its French version here, may have become moot in just over six years, but it will stand forever as the first time that Britain was compelled by military force to negociate a treaty as equals with indiginous citizens of the New World. The incident has lasting imporance to African American history, and the lamentable history of the Slave Trade. (There is even a painting which records the negotiations for the treaty -- commissioned of the itinerant artist Agostino Brunias by Sir William Young, a major landowner on Saint Vincent, who became governor of Dominica; lithographs based on the painting were sold). Of course, there is much other news from all over Europe in these pages, including an interesting account from the future United States with details of the grant of land to Phineas Lyman and some of his fellow veterans of the French and Indian Wars. General Lyman was the most experienced American soldier of the period prior to the Revolution. He moved to England after 1762 and spent the next nine years petitioning for a grant of land in the newly established colony of West Florida. A tract near Natchez (now Mississippi) was granted by royal charter in 1772. Lyman led a band of settlers to the region in 1773 -- (see pp. 42-3 of Numero 11, 20 Avril, 1773). There is much in these pages about the troubles of the East India Company, and the Wilkes affair, as well. And, finally, there is an account of a significant incident in the tensions which moved events towards the American Revolution. Colonial Governor of Massachusetts Thomas Hutchinson, in a speech to the assembly, argued that either the colony was wholly subject to Parliament, or that it was effectively independent. The Boston Provincial Assembly's response, authored by John Adams, Samuel Adams, and Joseph Hawley, countered that the colonial charter granted autonomy -- and was described in an account on pages 39-40 of Numero 13, 10 Mai, 1773. 
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THE GENEVA PRELIMINARY MEETING of the UNIVERSAL RELIGIOUS PEACE CONFERENCE, Anonymous
6 Anonymous THE GENEVA PRELIMINARY MEETING of the UNIVERSAL RELIGIOUS PEACE CONFERENCE
New York WCIPTR 1928 First Edition Pamphlet Very Good+ 8vo 
36 pages; September 1928. Publication No. 6. Near Fine in original blue wrappers. Frontispiece photograph. OCLC: 14957599; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
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THE MASTER RACE MENTALITY -  "We or They", Anspacher, Louis Kaufman
7 Anspacher, Louis Kaufman THE MASTER RACE MENTALITY - "We or They"
New York Island Workshop Press 1945 First Edition Paperback Very Good 8vo 8" - 9" tall 
29 pages; Clean and tight in original mustard wrappers. During the last years of World War II, Louis K. Anspacher, an American playwright and poet, published this anti-German polemic. His radical arguement is that Pan-German nationalism is pervasive in Germans as a whole, and that it must be wiped out entirely. OCLC 1930282 
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Speech of N. P. Banks, Jr. of Mass., on the Employment of Army Officers in National Armories delivered at the House of Representatives, Banks, Nathaniel P
8 Banks, Nathaniel P Speech of N. P. Banks, Jr. of Mass., on the Employment of Army Officers in National Armories delivered at the House of Representatives
Washington, D.C U.S. Congress 1854 First Edition Original Wrappers Very Good Octavo 
16 pages; Original printed wrappers. This is the original 1854 printing. ; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
Price: 17.96 USD
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Kentucky before Boone - The Siouan People, Beckner, Lucien
9 Beckner, Lucien Kentucky before Boone - The Siouan People
Frankfort Kentucky Historical Society 1948 First Edition Paperback Very Good 
The Register of the Kentucky Historical Society Vol. 46 No. 154 January 1948; 81 pages; A fourteen page article in the January 1948 issue of The Register of the Kentucky Historical Society. Clean and tight in original printed wrappers. Contents include: Governor Earle C. Clements - A Biographical Sketch by Dr. W. R. Jillson; Kentucky Before Boone - The Siouan People by Lucien Beckner; Confederate Letters; Kentucky Confederates Buried at Camp Douglas; State Archives, Casey County Deaths; Queries: A Branch of the Kentucky Logans; Bible Record of Robert and Frances Harris. Society Reports and Book Reviews. 
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THE BATTLE OF NEFA [North East Frontier Agency]  The Undeclared War, Bhargava, G. S.
10 Bhargava, G. S. THE BATTLE OF NEFA [North East Frontier Agency] The Undeclared War
Bombay Allied Publishers 1964 First Edition Hardcover Very Good- 8vo 8" - 9" tall 
(xii), 187 pages; Contents clean and tight in original rose cloth binding; faded at spine and edges. All three folding maps present and in very good condition. OCLC 252011278 October 20, 1962, the Chinese launched a barbaric and ruthless attack on the northern frontiers of India. It was an escalation of the many small border skirmishes had taken place between the two countries near the India-Bhutan-Tibet border. 
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La Suisse et Son Armée dans la Guerre Mondiale 1914-1919, Bordeaux, General P.-E
11 Bordeaux, General P.-E La Suisse et Son Armée dans la Guerre Mondiale 1914-1919
Paris Payot 1931 First Edition Paperback Very Good 8vo 
Collection de Mémoires, Etudes et Documents pour servir à l'Histoire de la Guerre Mondiale; Unmarked and tight in original printed wrappers; wrappers a bit worn at spine. This competent study of Switzerland's military activities during World War I fills an important gap. 
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12 Brock, Capitaine Emile Paul La Topographie de l'Artilleur Avec 41 figures dans le texte et 2 planches hors texte
Nancy Berger-Levrault 1926 Paperback Good 8vo 
138 pages; Former owner's name on front wrapper and half-title [Major Anderegg]; contents secure in original red wrappers; wrappers rubbed and chipped along spine. An important text on topography prepared for the training of French artillery men between World War I and World War II. Many diagrams and some folding plans. OCLC: 458888475 
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The Law Reports - High Court of Admiralty, and Ecclesiastical Courts Reported by Ernst Browning ... Edited by James Redfoord Bulwer ... From Michaelmas Term, 1865, to Trinity Term, 1867, Browning (Reporter), Ernst ;  James Redfoord Bulwer, editor
13 Browning (Reporter), Ernst ; James Redfoord Bulwer, editor The Law Reports - High Court of Admiralty, and Ecclesiastical Courts Reported by Ernst Browning ... Edited by James Redfoord Bulwer ... From Michaelmas Term, 1865, to Trinity Term, 1867
London Printed for the Council of Law Reporting, by Wm. Clowes and Sons 1867 First Edition Hardcover Very Good- 8vo 
xv & 409 pages; Publisher's tan half calf over vertically-ribbed terra-cotta cloth, with a pair of contrasting spine labels lettered in gilt. Outer hinges rubbed and cracking, but covers still soundly attached. With the booklabel of the Philadelphia Law Bookseller Joseph M. Mitchell, the bookplate of Law Society of Jersey, and pasted over that bookplate, the bookplate of the Library of Congress. The LC bookplate has been overstamped with the Surplus-Duplicate division stamp, in pale red ink. The first case in this volume considers a matter of considerable American interest. The ship "Helen" was built and owned by the British-based Albion Trading Company, designed as a blockade-runner, intended to evade the United States of America's Blockade of the Confederate States in order to transport Southern cotton to England. The Master of the Helen sued the owners for payment of wages. One of the grounds cited by the owners in their defence asserted that the running of a blockade was illegal, hence the contracts made with the Master and crew were invalid. The court found otherwise, stating that a neutral party could indeed seek to run such a blockade without contravening the Law of Nations. The matter and its resolution was not just a footnote of the American Civil War, but a matter of lasting international importance; Britannia did, indeed, truly rule the waves, after all. The most substantial component of this volume is the legal case surrounding a matter of extraordinary importance to British (and world) history. The Admiralty Court was the venue of the hearing of claims for shares in the booty captured at Banda and Kirwee during the supression of the Indian Rebellion of 1857-8. The battle at Banda was a signal (and unpredictable) victory for the British forces. General Sir George Whitlock, commanding a column seeking to supress the Sepoy rebellion in the Madras Presidency, followed his capture of Sagar by advanced with a force of about 1000 men to confront the rebel Nawab of Banda, who commanded a force of 7000 men. Despite the vast superiority of rebel forces , in April of 1858 Whitlock routed the Nawab, who lost 17 guns, about 1000 of his men killed, and the palace at Banda. General Whitlock lost 7 men in his victory; he then moved on to Kirwee in early June where the majority of the booty at issue here was found. Besides brass guns and munitions of war of every kind, he found the greater part of the booty which the court was being asked to divide, consisting of specie, jewels, and diamonds. To quantify this captured hoard, the value was stated in court as "seven millions of rupees." (For comparison's sake, the capture of Jhansi and Calpee by the parallel British column commanded by Sir Hugh Rose was evaluated at half a million rupees.) It may seem odd that the this matter, which took place hundreds of miles from the sea, wound up under adjudication in Admiralty Court. As a consequence of the Rebellion, the British East India Company was dissolved, and the control of India ceeded to the British Government. A section of the Act 3 and 4 Victoria, Cap. 65, provides that " The High Court of Admiralty shall have jurisdiction to decide all questions concerning booty of war, or the distribution thereof, which it shall please Her Majesty, her heirs and successors, by the advice of her and their Privy Council, to refer to the judgment of the said Court." It did please her Majesty Queen Victoria so to refer. There is a folding, colored map of the Madras Presidency, which shows the routes of Generals Whitlock, Rose, and the other several claimants. The court upheld Whitlock's claim, and dis-allowed claims by Sir Hugh Rose and others -- but did uphold a share for Colin Campbell, 1st Baron Clyde as the Commander in Chief of the British forces in India. (A posthumous share, we should note). This original edition is now scarce. See OCLC Number: 80495645 (four locations -- plus the British Library under a separate number:OCLC Number: 561968209). Interestingly, there was also an American edition [Philadelphia, T. & J.W. Johnson & Co., law booksellers, 1868-1870]. 
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Charles W. Quantrell - A True History of his Guerrilla Warfare on the Missouri and Kansas Border during the Civil War of 1861 to 1865 [Cover title: A True Story of Chas. W. Quantrell and His Guerrilla Band], Burch, John P. ; Captain Harrison Trow
14 Burch, John P. ; Captain Harrison Trow Charles W. Quantrell - A True History of his Guerrilla Warfare on the Missouri and Kansas Border during the Civil War of 1861 to 1865 [Cover title: A True Story of Chas. W. Quantrell and His Guerrilla Band]
Vega, Texas J.P. Burch 1923 First Edition Hardcover Very Good+ 8vo 8" - 9" tall 
266 pages; As told by Captain Harrison Trow, one who followed Quantrell through his whole course. Former owner's name on ffep, otherwise clean and secure in original dark red cloth binding with gilt lettering and image of Quantrell [actually William Clarke Quantrill] on front board. B&W illustrations. OCLC: 734750 "written just as Captain Harrison Trow told it to John P. Burch, [this book presents] accounts of fights that he participated in, narrow escapes experienced, dilemmas it seemed almost impossible to get out of, and also other battles; the life of the James boys and Youngers as they were with Quantrell during the war, and after the war, when they became outlaws by publicity of the daily newspapers, being accused of things which they never did and which were laid at their feet." The mispelling of Quantrill's name results from the fact that this book was transcribed by Burch from the first hand narrative Capt. Harrison Trow who was one of Quantrill's Raiders. William Clarke Quantrill (who also went by Charles Hart and Charles Quantrell at times), was the leader of a Confederate band that operated in Missouri and Kansas, employing methods similar to guerrilla warfare of the 20th century. 
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RECORDS OF THE COLUMBIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF WASHINGTON, DC 1946-1947, VOLUME 48-49 includes Why John Wilkes Booth Killed Abraham Lincoln and History of the Automobile in the District of Columbia, Caemmerer, Paul ; (editor)
15 Caemmerer, Paul ; (editor) RECORDS OF THE COLUMBIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF WASHINGTON, DC 1946-1947, VOLUME 48-49 includes Why John Wilkes Booth Killed Abraham Lincoln and History of the Automobile in the District of Columbia
Washington, DC Columbia Historical Society Washington, DC 1949 Hardcover Very Good+ 8vo 
Vol. 48-49; Articles include: Public Schools of the District of Columbia 1885 to 1945 ; The Irish in the Early Days of the District ; Participation of the District of Columbia in World War II ; Why John Wilkes Booth Killed Abraham Lincoln ; History of the Automobile in the District of Columbia; History of the Telephone System in the District of Columbia; Early Washington and Its Art; Fifty Five Years of Local Baseball 1893 - 1947 by Frederick S. Tyler ; etc. ; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
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How America can Easily and Quickly Prevent Wars Forever, Carnovale, Luigi
16 Carnovale, Luigi How America can Easily and Quickly Prevent Wars Forever
Chicago n.p. 1924 First Edition Stiff Wrappers Fine 8vo 
35 pages; without the necessity of a League of Nations, of a World Court, of treaties of alliance, of entanglements of any sort on the part of the United States itself with the nations of Europe and with the nations of other parts of the world, without the necessity of insisting on the Monroe Doctrine; and even without the necessity of eliminating the causes of wars -- An Original, Independent Peace Plan - the simplest and most practical. OCLC: 4695766; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
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Middle Temple Ordeal - being an account of what World War II meant to the Inn, with an appendix of dates and events, Cassels, Justice
17 Cassels, Justice Middle Temple Ordeal - being an account of what World War II meant to the Inn, with an appendix of dates and events
London Honourable Society of the Middle Temple 1948 First Edition Paperback Very Good 8vo 
55 pages; Clean and tight in original blue printed wrappers, typed note laid-in "With the Compliments of the Treasurer and Masters of the Bench" on letterhead of The Honourable Society of the Middle Temple. Foreword by Justice Cassels. Profusely illustrated with photographs before and after the bombings during World War II. OCLC: 2347457 
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ACTIVE SERVICE, Castleman, John Breckinridge ; (Major C.S.A.; Brigadier General U.S.A.)
18 Castleman, John Breckinridge ; (Major C.S.A.; Brigadier General U.S.A.) ACTIVE SERVICE
Louisville, KY Courier-Journal Job Printing 1917 First Edition Paperback Very Good 4to 11" - 13" tall 
269 pages; Original owner's initials on ffep dated Dec 1917 followed by brief inscription "My Willie/ With his wife's dearest love/ A.B. Jones" otherwise clean and tight in original gray cloth binding lettered in navy blue. Cloth generally dust soiled, rubbed at extremities. OCLC: 1540685 John Breckinridge Castleman (1841 – 1918) was a Confederate Major and a Brigadier General (U.S. Army) from Kentucky. During the Civil War, Castleman and his 41 recruits in Lexington, Kentucky went to Knoxville, Tennessee to form the Second Kentucky Cavalry company under John Hunt Morgan. Major Castleman led his guerrillas in an attempt to burn supply boats in St. Louis, Missouri but was arrested in October 1864. He was convicted of spying and sentenced to death, but his execution was stayed by Abraham Lincoln. Following the war, Castleman was exiled from the United States, and studied medicine in France. He was pardoned by Andrew Johnson and returned to Kentucky in 1866. He revived the Louisville Legion, a militia unit, in 1878 and became adjutant general of Kentucky in 1883. The unit became the 1st Kentucky Volunteers in the Spanish–American War, and Castleman was commissioned a colonel in the U.S. Army. His unit participated in the invasion of Puerto Rico, and after the war he was promoted to brigadier general and served as military governor of the island. 
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STATEMENT OF THE SUGAR CROP, Made in Louisiana in 1861-62, With an Appendix, Champomier, P. A.
19 Champomier, P. A. STATEMENT OF THE SUGAR CROP, Made in Louisiana in 1861-62, With an Appendix
New Orleans Cook, Young & Company Price-Current Office 1862 Paperback Very Good 12mo 7" - 7½" tall 
x, (2), 46 pages; Contents clear and unmarked secure in original printed yellow wrappers with light dust soiling and chipping along spine and first few leaves of upper corner. Quite scarce New Orleans imprint from the Civil War on the all important sugar industry. Text in English and French. OCLC: 191315365 Contents: Explanation, Index, Index to Post-Office References, The Cane Culture, Introduction, Introduction (French version), Statement of Sugar made in Louisiana in 1861-62 by P.A. Champomier (Parish by Parish including Number of Hogsheads and Distance from New Orleans, names of planters and parishes), Recapitulation which includes the number of hhds. of sugar, number of horse power, number of steam power and number of sugar houses, Sugar Crops In Texas, 1859, Sugar Trade of the United States, General Remarks, Observations Generales Louisiana voted to secede from the Union on January 22, 1861. The Union capture of New Orleans took place between April 25 – May 1, 1862. This publication was issued in August 1862 during the Federal occupation of New Orleans. This is the second issue of Sabin 11850; Jumonville, 3242; Crandall 2903; Parrish & Willingham: 5236. 
Price: 249.94 USD
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GAZETTE FRANCOISE, A Facsimile Reprint of a Newspaper Printed at Newport on the Printing Press of the French Fleet in American Waters During the Revolutionary War, Chapin, Howard M.
20 Chapin, Howard M. GAZETTE FRANCOISE, A Facsimile Reprint of a Newspaper Printed at Newport on the Printing Press of the French Fleet in American Waters During the Revolutionary War
New York The Grolier Club 1926 Hardcover Very Good Folio 13" - 23" tall 
Clean and tight in original binding of navy blue cloth spine over cream coloured boards. Contents quite Fine, faint linear shadow at front cover. Four page printed prospectus laid-in. Limited Edition of only 300 copies printed on Arches hand-made paper by Douglas C. McMurtrie, completed in November, 1926. This copy bears the handsome bookplate of Harris D. Colt. The Gazette Francoise newspaper translated various news items printed in American newspapers to keep the officers and men of the French Fleet in American Waters During the Revolutionary War abreast of political events in this emerging nation. It is the first known service newspaper published by an expeditionary force. ; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
Price: 43.94 USD
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