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The Case for Impeachment of Richard M. Nixon - Now [Broadsheet with old video cassette in plastic case], AFL-CIO
1 AFL-CIO The Case for Impeachment of Richard M. Nixon - Now [Broadsheet with old video cassette in plastic case]
Washington, D.C. American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations 1973 (& 1974) VHS Tape Very Good 4to 
1 pages; Broadsheet -- 45 x 28 cm, folded twice to make a small quarto gathering: (folded size: 23 x 14 cm.) The "Title page" in this folded format has the printed notation, underlined, at the top: "First in a Series." The last page of the folded format has the running title: "A Full and Fair Hearing." The nine-paragraph text begins: "The AFL-CIO believes that President Nixon should be impeached. Last week we published the 19-point bill of particulars that led to that conclusion. This week we begin a series documenting those charges..." Signed (in facsimile) at the bottom "George Meany" with the printed note at the bottom: "Reprinted from the AFL-CIO News, Nov. 17, 1973." With both folds open, the verso of the sheet forms a single broadside in double columns. The text contains a detailed timeline of the AFL-CIO points in favor of its call for impeachment. Printed at the bottom is the name and Washington DC address of the labor organization. This broadsheet is described in a single OCLC Number, with only one location reported [see OCLC Number 68129481 -- NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIV. This is for the broadsheet only; no mention of a video component in the description] Our copy is tucked into a large plastic clamshell box. The molded plastic box contains an old video cassette. There are two typed paper labels attached to the clear plastic "window" at the top side of this ancient Sony cassette. One reads: "INAUGERATION [sic] OF PRES. FORD. 8/9/74 / TAPE 1." This label has an additional notation handwritten in ink: "acceptance speech." The lower label has the typed text: "PRESIDENT' NIXON'S ABDICATION. / Tape 1" The Surplus-Duplicate stamp of the Library of Congress has been stamped vertically accross the pair of labels. Even for those of us old enough to remember (and still own) the once-ubiquitous VHS format video cassette tapes, this object is unfamiliar. It is larger, thicker, and heavier than the VHS tapes (or the smaller Sony Betamax tapes which preceded the VHS tapes to the graveyard of technical formats). This is a Sony U-matic analog recording videocassette format -- introduced to the market in September 1971. The tape is 3/4" (1.9 cm - as opposed to the familiar consumer formats which both measured 1/2"). It was among the first video formats to employ a cassette, rather than the reel-to-reel tapes (2" and 1") which had been used before, mostly by broadcast television stations. Another unusual feature, considering all that came later: the supply and take-up reels in the cassette turn in opposite directions during playback, fast-forward, and rewind: one reel would run clockwise while the other would run counter-clockwise. As a potential consumer format, the U-Matic system was a failure. The tapes were expensive (particularly the largest capacity model like this example, which held up to a hour's worth of video). The play-back equipment was VERY expensive. However, the format was very successful for such applications as business communication. Film companies also used U-Matic widely for daily rushes. But the largest group of users constituted broadcast television; local TV stations and national TV networks adopted the Sony U-Matic format when its first portable model, the Sony VO-3800, was released in 1974. "Electronic News Gathering" as the system came to be called, may have been expensive, but so was the 16-mm film camera and related ancillary equipment formerly used out on location. And, crucially, U-Matic video was so much faster. While we cannot prove that this 40-year old video cassette was issued by the AFL-CIO -- the Library of Congress would have had no reason to tuck their "Case for Impeachment..." broadside in the case before making the choice not to accession this object. It is most likely that this case and contents were sent to the LC in hopes of registering a Copyright. In support of this assumption, the metal guard across the tape access window of the cassette body has the stamped letters: "Copyrighted Program" at the top edge. The side edge is usefully stamped: "Do not touch the tape inside." (An interesting side note: the large, round, red button on the underside of the cassette body, marked with the raised letter: "R" is still present. One would expect that this would have been removed, which would make it impossible to erase this tape. The blank tapes were expensive (one-hour first series U-Matic tapes then sold for about $100 each in quantity), so it is likely that this was done by the AFL-CIO in a limited number of copies. Of course, then, as now, the major operatives of political lobbying seemed to have vast resources at their fingertips . So, this now-rare video-tape and the broadside contained in its purpose-molded plastic case, represents a rare peek at "inside-the-beltway" politics of four decades ago. The Watergate affair was, arguably, the beginning of the 24-hour news cycle, with revelations seemingly coming daily during those crowded months of 1974. The new speed of reporting, and information (both for providers and recipients) was largely made possible by technical advances such as the U-Matic three-quarter video tape offered here. If prospective customers wonder about current means of playing the tape, it is still true that many public television stations maintain an old deck or two in their racks, since so many programs and films were archived in this format back in the day. If all else fails, the Library of Congress audio and media facility in Culpeper, Virginia, holds thousands of its titles on U-matic video (many of them copyright deposit exemplars) and the means to play them. For the technically inclined, this cassette is the old and original U-Matic cassette format, rather than the similar, but slightly smaller U-Matic S (which was not widely used until 1975, but quickly became almost universal). The distinction between the two formats does bolster the supposition that this tape was made and circulated in the warm months of 1974, as Watergate news was breaking, rather than even slightly later. The plasic case shows minor wear, particularly at the bottom edge of the "spine" -- and has a 5-inch cut to the plastic surface along the "rear" cover. The front cover is dusty, and has a plastic sleeve meant to receive a title slip -- (now empty). 
Price: 249.95 USD
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Freedom of the Seas, Anderson, Chandler P
2 Anderson, Chandler P Freedom of the Seas
Philadelphia Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 1917 Paperback Very Good 8vo 
10 pages; Contents clean and tight in printed wrappers. Reprinted from the Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, July 1917. Chandler Parsons Anderson (1866-1936), Scroll & Key 1887, represented the United States in numerous international legal issues, including the Bering Sea Claims Commission, Alaska Boundary Tribunal, North Atlantic Coast Fisheries Arbitration, and was legal advisor to U.S. embassies and legations and the State Department. OCLC 4895953325 
Price: 10.95 USD
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Immunity of Neutral Sea-Borne Commerce, Anderson, Chandler P
3 Anderson, Chandler P Immunity of Neutral Sea-Borne Commerce
American Journal of International Law 1930 Paperback Very Good 8vo 
7 pages; Reprinted from the American Journal of International Law, Volume 24, Number 1, January 1930. Chandler Parsons Anderson (1866-1936), Scroll & Key 1887, represented the United States in numerous international legal issues, including the Bering Sea Claims Commission, Alaska Boundary Tribunal, North Atlantic Coast Fisheries Arbitration, and was legal advisor to U.S. embassies and legations and the State Department. OCLC 4890192461 
Price: 10.95 USD
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The Final Outcome of the Fisheries Arbitration, Anderson, Chandler P
4 Anderson, Chandler P The Final Outcome of the Fisheries Arbitration
American Journal of International Law 1918 Paperback Very Good 8vo 
16 pages; Contents clean and tight, rear wrapper torn. Reprinted from the American Journal of International Law, January 1913. Chandler Parsons Anderson (1866-1936), Scroll & Key 1887, represented the United States in numerous international legal issues, including the Bering Sea Claims Commission, Alaska Boundary Tribunal, North Atlantic Coast Fisheries Arbitration, and was legal advisor to U.S. embassies and legations and the State Department. OCLC 4890176293 
Price: 10.95 USD
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Estatutos de la Compañía de Alumbrado por Gas en Lima Reformados en 1869, Anonymous
5 Anonymous Estatutos de la Compañía de Alumbrado por Gas en Lima Reformados en 1869
Lima [Peru] Imprenta Calle de Lampa Num. 215 por J. V. Serrano 1869 Paperback Good+ 12mo 
Title & 27 pages; Removed document. Title printed within a decorative border. Gutter margins dusty, worn, and somewhat bent from having been extracted from a volume. Stamped on the title page in blue ink "Exchange ... Serial Record Division The Library of Congress." Above this, the LC Surplus-Duplicate stamp appears (faintly) in red ink. Gas lightling in Lima appears to date back to at least 1861, judging from a reference in this volume. We can find no other record of a copy -- Not in OCLC, COPAC, etc. We did find a record of a similar title printed 5 years later, from a different printer: [*** reformados, 1874 – Lima: Empresa Tipográfica Camaná]. Our copy has a few neatly written annotations in ink. Several of these, written in the fore-edge margins have been partly trimmed by a previous binder. 
Price: 100.00 USD
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GEREFORMEERDE DYCK - RECHTEN VAN THIELRE ENDE BOMMELRE - WEERDEN, Anonymous
6 Anonymous GEREFORMEERDE DYCK - RECHTEN VAN THIELRE ENDE BOMMELRE - WEERDEN
Arnhem By Die Weduwe Van Joh: Frederick Hagen 1683 Hardcover Very Good 4to 
100 pages; Small 4to: Unpaginated -- 50 leaves. At the end, there is a separately paginated appendix -- "Contract Over het opmaaken van doorgebrooke Dihken in Boemelerweerd, waervan mentie word gemaekt Cap. XVI. Van de Gereformeerde Dihkrechten ..." 7 & [1, blank] pp. Uncut, in contemporary pattern-printed paper covered boards, backed with dark red sheep. The spine is rubbed (much color is lost) -- and the main text is printed on paper which shows considerable browning throughout. (The 8-page appendix at the end is not affected by this browning) . A scarce book about the laws concerning dykes and their consequences. There is a small slip of paper with a single word pasted over another word on the bottom line of the recto of K1.; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
Price: 499.95 USD
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Journal Historique Et Politique Des Principaux Événements Des Différentes Cours de L'Europe  including "Traite de paix entre l'Angleterre & les Caraïbes de l'isle Saint-Vincent", Anonymous
7 Anonymous Journal Historique Et Politique Des Principaux Événements Des Différentes Cours de L'Europe including "Traite de paix entre l'Angleterre & les Caraïbes de l'isle Saint-Vincent"
Genève [but probably Paris] Ch.- J. Panckoucke 1773 First Edition Hardcover Very Good 12mo 
On offer here is an attractive volume in 18th century full calf, bound in the French style, (flat spine with floral tools in gilt, red label lettered in gilt, marbled endpapers, edges decoratively stained red). The volume in which these interesting numbers of the now-scarce 'Journal Historique Et Politique Des Principaux Événements Des Différentes Cours de L'Europe' is in a handsome contemporary binding which shows only minor rubbing -- mostly along the hinges, apart from some moderate fraying and loss at the corners and erosion of the top cap of the spine, exposing the headband. The original swirl-marbled endpapers are intact and the inner hinges are tight and secure; the sewing is sound and tight throughout. There are scattered brown marks and paper flaws, reflecting the mediocre quality of the paper selected for this journal, which was hardly expected to last for 240 years. This volume contains issues 10-18 of the interesting periodical "Journal Historique Et Politique Des Principaux Événements Des Différentes Cours de L'Europe," covering events of April-June of 1773. This journal was published every 10 days for the active Parisian publisher and bookseller Charles-Joseph Panckoucke. One of the "différentes Cours de L'Europe" in which events were covered extensively was London, with pages of details of goings on in England and its colonies offered in each issue. There is an unusually detailed account, with full text (in French) of a significant treaty signed by a representative of King George III: "Traite de paix entre l'Angleterre & les Caraïbes de l'isle Saint-VIncent." This appears on pp. 45-48 of Numero 12 -- issued 30 Avril, 1773. The treaty is presented as having been agreed to on the 17th "de ces mois," and so it is very much in the category of breaking news. This treaty is now fairly (but undeservedly) obscure, but the situation it attempted to settle grew out of one famous treaty, from ten years before and it proved to be a fascinating precursor to another more famous treaty, signed ten years later. In one of the lesser re-assignments of the territories of the world effected by the 1763 Treaty of Paris at the conclusion of the Seven Years' War -- Britain was awarded the right to rule over the Caribbean island of Saint Vincent. The island's history, of course, is much older; native American Arawak and Carib tribes settled over several centuries on a number of islands in the Lesser Antilles including St.Vincent. The Arawaks arrived around 100AD, and the Caribs about a thousand years later. The Caribs, more organized and aggressive, subdued and absorbed the culture of the Arawaks. Shortly after the first British claim on Saint Vincent in 1627, two Dutch ships carrying captured Nigerians destined for slavery were shipwrecked in 1635 off the coast of St. Vincent. Some of the Africans were able to swim ashore and find shelter in the Carib villages. This population of Africans and their descendants was augmented over the years, including in 1675 when a ship carrying British settlers and their slaves was shipwrecked between St. Vincent and Bequia. Only the slaves survived the shipwreck and they also came to live and mix with the native mixed Carib-Arawak population. A certain number of escaped slaves from nearby Barbados, Grenada and St. Lucia also added to the African-Carib population. After some friction, and even wars, eventually the native Caribs and the newer African arrivals merged and blended their cultures. British settlers distinguished them as "Black Caribs" and "Red (or yellow) Caribs. The "Black" people so-designated by outsiders preferred to call themselves Garifuna. Throughout some of this period, there were French settlers who arrived with the intention of making their living as planters. They seemed to get along with the native population with less friction, but the British land owners seemed united in their desire to form large plantations and to run the Caribs off the most desireable land. They tried to buy the land, tried military action with the minor forces available, but the "Black" Caribs resisted both efforts. The British raised the stakes by sending Major General William Dalrymple, with troops borrowed from around the Caribbean and augmented by two regiments which were sent from North America (Dalrymple himself had been dispatched from Boston, where he had technically been in command of troops involved in the Boston Massacre, although he himself had not been present). Despite his best efforts, Dalrymple was unable to subdue the resisting Caribs, led by the now-legendary Chief Joseph Chatoyer -- who knew the windward side of the islands and the hills far better than any of their combantants. In February, opponents of the Government of Lord North raised objections in Parliament, and obtained votes which compelled the British Government to end the fighting and secure peace on the best terms possible. The French language text offered here appears to be a word for word version of the 24 articles of the English treaty published in the 'Saint Vincent Gazette' of 27 February 1773. One article, number VIII, is of extraordinary interest concerning Slavery and the trade (which would continue in the British possessions for nearly another sixty years). The heart of this article requires that Runaway Slaves in the possession of the Caribs are to be given up, that efforts must be made to discover and capture others, and it must be agreed that no future efforts to encourage, receive or harbour other slaves shall be made, under the penalty of fortiture of lands. Finally, it was stated that removal of Slaves from the Island constituted a Capital crime. The Caribs were required to pledge allegiance to King George III, but were made British subjects (which gave legal standing to enforce article VIII, of course). In return, the British ceded a well-defined portion of the Island to the Caribs -- (called the prettiest and most fertile part of the land by at least one subsequent scholar). Thus concluded the first Anglo-Carib War. This treaty did not endure for the ages... During three days in June of 1779, French ships fighting on behalf of the Revolutionaries in (North) America quickly took possession of Saint Vincent (with the assistance of Joseph Chatoyer and the "Black Caribs"). But in the Treaty of Versailles which was an ancillary treaty to the Treaty of Paris 1783 by which Britain also recognized the end of the American Revolutionary War saw the British restored as sovereigns over Saint Vincent. Relations between the British and their once-again subjects, the Caribs, disintegrated. The situation brought about a second Anglo-Carib war (1794-6), once again led by Joseph Chatoyer. As in the first war, the Caribs gave the British forces all they could manage for over a year, but after the death in battle of Chatoyer on March 14, 1795, the end seemed inevitable, although fighting raged throughout St. Vincent over the next year with both sides sustaining heavy losses. The final battle took place at Vigie on June 10th, 1796. After a night of arduous fighting the Caribs approached the British with a truce flag. The victorious British then did a remarkable thing, which has repercussions lasting throughout the Caribbean and extending to South and North America through the present time. They sorted the 5000 Caribs who surrendered, separating the darkest skinned individuals, and those with the most "African" features, from the "Yellow Caribs." This darkest majority of the so-called Black Caribs were first sent to Balliceaux in the Grenadines and then on to Bequia. Eventually, in 1797 the survivors were transported hundreds of miles to the island of Roatan off the Honduran coast in Central America. This extraordinary settlement has permanently affected the modern populations of Belize, Guatemala, Nicaragua, and Honduras. The 1773 treaty offered in its French version here, may have become moot in just over six years, but it will stand forever as the first time that Britain was compelled by military force to negociate a treaty as equals with indiginous citizens of the New World. The incident has lasting imporance to African American history, and the lamentable history of the Slave Trade. (There is even a painting which records the negotiations for the treaty -- commissioned of the itinerant artist Agostino Brunias by Sir William Young, a major landowner on Saint Vincent, who became governor of Dominica; lithographs based on the painting were sold). Of course, there is much other news from all over Europe in these pages, including an interesting account from the future United States with details of the grant of land to Phineas Lyman and some of his fellow veterans of the French and Indian Wars. General Lyman was the most experienced American soldier of the period prior to the Revolution. He moved to England after 1762 and spent the next nine years petitioning for a grant of land in the newly established colony of West Florida. A tract near Natchez (now Mississippi) was granted by royal charter in 1772. Lyman led a band of settlers to the region in 1773 -- (see pp. 42-3 of Numero 11, 20 Avril, 1773). There is much in these pages about the troubles of the East India Company, and the Wilkes affair, as well. And, finally, there is an account of a significant incident in the tensions which moved events towards the American Revolution. Colonial Governor of Massachusetts Thomas Hutchinson, in a speech to the assembly, argued that either the colony was wholly subject to Parliament, or that it was effectively independent. The Boston Provincial Assembly's response, authored by John Adams, Samuel Adams, and Joseph Hawley, countered that the colonial charter granted autonomy -- and was described in an account on pages 39-40 of Numero 13, 10 Mai, 1773. 
Price: 950.00 USD
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SUGGESTIONS FOR LEAGUE SPEAKERS - Speech material for League of Nations addresses, Anonymous
8 Anonymous SUGGESTIONS FOR LEAGUE SPEAKERS - Speech material for League of Nations addresses
New York League To Enforce Peace 1919 Pamphlet Very Good 12mo 
71 & [1] pages; Publisher's tan printed wrappers, textured with a surface to resemble cloth. Library stamp on front cover, minor marks at top and bottom (from previously having been tied into a bundle with string or twine) -- generally very good. A collection of "talking points" for the use of speakers aiming to sway public opinion towards the difficult goal of ratification of Wilson's proposed League of Nations by the U.S. Senate after the first Wprld War. The last section contains helpful quotes in favor of the League by various notables, including former President Theodore Roosevelt, who died just before this pamphlet was published. Socially, this is quite interesting, as the national debate over ratification for the League of Nations is probably the last great U.S. issue argued and decided without a major role being played by Radio. So, a whole phalanx of speakers might be expected to argue a cause like this before a large number of local groups. Within a few short years, such gatherings and their influence would be supplemented, and finally superceded, by radio, and later, television. In any event, issue-oriented background material for speakers like the present pamphlet was prepared for a small number of activists, and largely consumed in the struggle, and the surviving copies quickly abandoned once the cause was decided. This is now quite scarce, after nearly 90 years. See OCLC 4175752.; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
Price: 19.95 USD
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CHINESE COMPANY LAW (Revised), Ao, Sen ; W.Y. Yu; K.T. Shien
9 Ao, Sen ; W.Y. Yu; K.T. Shien CHINESE COMPANY LAW (Revised)
Shanghai Ao Sen Law Office 1946 First Edition Thus Paperback Very Good- 12mo 7" - 7½" tall 
82 pages; Former owner's name on ffep, two editorial pencil marks (one on page 2 and one on page 65), otherwise text is clean and tight in original printed wrappers. Wrappers are chipped at edges and faded at spine. A very scarce English translation of the Chinese legal code relating to business. A typed label on front wrapper states "Not an Official Translation / See translation of Dr. Chao-yuen Chang." The Company Law promulgated in 1929 by the Nationalist government was the first comparatively complete Chinese legislation concerning companies. The 1929 Company Law was replaced by the expanded and greatly revised Company Law of 1946 (offered here). China's first written Constitution was promulgated in 1946, and later the same year representatives of the US and China signed a five year "Treaty of Friendship, Commerce, and Navigation" at Nanking. An article in Pravda claimed that this treaty returned China to a "semi-colonial condition" and re-established economic dependence on the US. Not surprisingly, this Chinese Company Law of 1946 came to an end in mainland China when the Communist party took over the government in 1949. This translation of the laws relating to the establishment of business and commerce was undertaken privately by the law firm of Ao Sen, Dean of the Soochow University Law School. It would be interesting to compare this translation to the "Official Translation" by Chao-yuen Chang. ; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
Price: 149.95 USD
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Roscoe Pound and the Resurgence of Juristic Idealism, Aronson, Moses J.
10 Aronson, Moses J. Roscoe Pound and the Resurgence of Juristic Idealism
New York Journal of Social Philosophy 1940 Paperback Very Good 8vo Signed by Author
Autograph; 37 pages; Clean and tight in original gray printed wrappers. Wrappers lightly toned. Published as a reprint from the Journal of Social Philosophy, Vol. 6, No... 1940, pp. 47-83. This copy has been inscribed "To Mr. Crawford M. Bishop / with the high regards of / M. J. Aronson"; Signed by Author 
Price: 14.95 USD
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THE JURISTIC THOUGHT OF MR. JUSTICE FRANKFURTER, Aronson, Moses J.
11 Aronson, Moses J. THE JURISTIC THOUGHT OF MR. JUSTICE FRANKFURTER
Journal of Social Philosophy 1940 First Edition Thus Paperback Very Good 8vo 
24 pages; Offprint from Journal of Social Philosophy, Vol 5, No. 2, January 1940. Clean and tight in original gray printed wrappers, front wrapper unevenly sunned. ; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
Price: 14.95 USD
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THE JURISTIC THOUGHT OF MR. JUSTICE FRANKFURTER, Aronson, Moses J. ; [SIGNED]
12 Aronson, Moses J. ; [SIGNED] THE JURISTIC THOUGHT OF MR. JUSTICE FRANKFURTER
Journal of Social Philosophy 1940 First Edition Thus Paperback Very Good 8vo Signed by Author
Autograph; 24 pages; Offprint from Journal of Social Philosophy, Vol 5, No. 2, January 1940. Inscribed and signed by the author to Professor James F. Davison. ; Signed by Author; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
Price: 24.95 USD
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HOW TO WRITE A TAX BRIEF  for use before the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, the Technical Staff, and the Board of Tax Appeals, Ash, Robert
13 Ash, Robert HOW TO WRITE A TAX BRIEF for use before the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, the Technical Staff, and the Board of Tax Appeals
New York Prentice Hall, Inc 1936 Pamphlet Very Good 8vo 
With suggestions for Drafting and Specimen of Brief Used Before the Board of Tax Appeals. Clean and tight in original printed wrappers. Very early edition of this standard guide to Tax Briefs. 
Price: 7.95 USD
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FEAR IN THE AIR -  Broadcasting and the First Amendment: the Anatomy of a Constitutional Crisis, Ashmore, Harry S. ; [Katharine Graham's Copy]
14 Ashmore, Harry S. ; [Katharine Graham's Copy] FEAR IN THE AIR - Broadcasting and the First Amendment: the Anatomy of a Constitutional Crisis
New York Norton 1973 0393083683 / 9780393083682 First Edition Hardcover Near Fine in Very Good dust jacket 8vo 8" - 9" tall Signed by Author
Autograph; 180 pages; Inscribed and SIGNED by the author on ffep "For Kay Graham -- who deserves a much higher accolade that the one contained herein -- HSA / Santa Barbara / October 1973." Katharine Graham (1917-2001) was the Publisher, and later, Chairman of the Board of the Washington Post Company. She was a noted Washington hostess, whose dinner table served so many of the powerful, influential and interesting people during their tenure in the Nation's Capitol. Harry Scott Ashmore (1916 – 1998) was an American journalist who won a Pulitzer Prize for his editorials in 1957 on the school integration conflict in Little Rock, Arkansas. Ashmore was first an editorial writer and eventually executive editor at the Arkansas Gazette in Little Rock, Arkansas. In 1958 the Arkansas Gazette won the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service during the school integration crisis of 1957. In the same year Harry Ashmore won the Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Writing, "For the forcefulness, dispassionate analysis and clarity of his editorials on the school integration conflict in Little Rock." This book on media and the First Amendment focuses on the attempts of the Nixon administration to stifle both print and broadcast media. The Washington Post and Katharine Graham were in the thick of this battle. A wonderful association copy. ; Signed by Author; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
Price: 74.95 USD
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CODE OF JUDICIAL CONDUCT, Association, American Bar  ; [Justice Potter Stewart ]
15 Association, American Bar ; [Justice Potter Stewart ] CODE OF JUDICIAL CONDUCT
Chicago American Bar Association 1972 First Edition Thus Paperback Very Good 
Autograph; 32 pages; Previous owner's initials at top of front wrapper "P.S." for Potter Stewart. Faint mark from paperclip at top of wrapper (now removed). This is a particularly fine provenance for this groundbreaking proposed second version of the American Bar Association's Code of Judicial Conduct, as Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart was an active member of the ABA Special Committee charged with preparing a long-needed revision to the ABA's first Code, prepared by a previous committee, which met first in 1922 chaired by former President William Howard Taft (who was soon to be appointed as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court). While the Taft committee's Code, adopted in 1924, made a fine start, over the years it was perceived to be vague and imprecise in its strictures. (Perhaps Judicial misconduct had advanced in its sophistication over the middle part of the twentieth century...) In August of 1969, a new ABA committee was charged with coming up with a revised code. The new committee was chaired by California Chief Justice Roger J. Traynor. The fourteen members also included two former ABA presidents (Whitney North Seymour and Edward L. Wright), and several eminent Judges, but the "biggest name" was certainly Supreme Court Associate Justice Potter Stewart, whose copy of the final draft this is. This ABA Code of Judicial Conduct represented a three-year effort on the part of the committee. Justice Stewart took an active part in the work of drafting this Code, and the two folded sheets laid into his copy demonstrate that his involvement and interest did not terminate with the final adoption by the whole ABA of the final draft of his Special Committee, in August of 1972 (when this pamphlet was printed). The "Code" was just a fine and lofty statement of ideals, until and unless the individual States of the union adopted these standards and based their own rules and penalties on the ABA "Code." Justice Potter Stewart certainly followed the path to adoption of these standards by the fifty American States, and is likely to have done some behind the scenes persuasion where it might have been deemed necessary. These two printed sheets laid into his copy are xeroxes dated October 31, 1974; one charting the states which had adopted the "Code of Judicial Conduct" as of October 31, 1974 (this chart is broken down by parts of the process, including whether or not the particular State's Supreme Courts had the power to adopt the draft "Code's" standards, whether the particular States' Bar Associations assistance was wanted, and the expected dates when particular States were likely to adopt the "Code." The other sheet is a map of the United States showing graphically which states had already adopted the "Code", and which had yet to do so. To put this in perspective, part of the deficiency of the ABA's 1924 Code was that some States had never adopted it, and others had introduced a confusing array of amendments. A fine provenance: from the collection of Justice Potter Stewart who served as a Justice on the U.S. Supreme Court for nearly 24 years. In 1958, President Dwight D. Eisenhower nominated Potter Stewart to the Supreme Court to replace Justice Harold Hitz Burton, who was retiring. Stewart served on the Supreme Court until he announced his retirement from the Court on June 18, 1981 at the age of 66. During his tenure (1958-1981) as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court, Potter Stewart made major contributions to criminal justice reform, civil rights, access to the courts, and Fourth Amendment jurisprudence. Stewart leaned toward moderate, pragmatic positions, but was often in the position of dissenting during his time on the Warren Court. Stewart's philosophy might be most coherently traced to Justice Robert Jackson, about whom Stewart said: "He saw that 'judicial activism' could be a deadening and stultifying force... that every coercive and centralizing court decision deals a blow ... to the ability and then to the will of the democratic process to operate with responsibility and vigor." ; Signed by Notable Personage, Related 
Price: 99.95 USD
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COMPILATION OF THE LAWS IN FORCE IN THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA  APRIL 1, 1868, Authors, Various
16 Authors, Various COMPILATION OF THE LAWS IN FORCE IN THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA APRIL 1, 1868
Washington Government Printing Office 1868 First Edition Hardcover Very Good- 8vo 8" - 9" tall 
494 pages; Contents clean and secure in original green cloth binding, rubbed at spine ends and corners. Faint damp mark at lower edge of text block. OCLC: 19026790 This copy belonged to John Burton Thompson (December 14, 1810 – January 7, 1874) was a United States Representative and Senator from Kentucky - name label on front cover. The first section reiterates the Constitutional Provision and the various 18th century laws establishing the seat of government at the District of Columbia. Several moves to establish and construct a jail in DC and appointment of officers to manage and govern the District; extensive sections on Property Laws, Criminal Laws, Establishment of Courts and a judicial procedures; Education, which starts with a series (1862-1867) of laws providing for the education of colored children in the cities of Washington, Georgetown and the District of Columbia and construction of schools; etc. Also includes the Emancipation Proclamation and many of the fundamental laws of Reconstruction. Indexed.; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
Price: 349.95 USD
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HAND-LIST OF LEGISLATIVE SESSIONS AND SESSION LAWS, Statutory Revisions, Compilations, Codes, Etc., And Constitutional Conventions  of the United States and its possessions and of the several states to May, 1912, Babbitt, Charles J. ; Prepared Under the Direction of Charles F. D. Belden
17 Babbitt, Charles J. ; Prepared Under the Direction of Charles F. D. Belden HAND-LIST OF LEGISLATIVE SESSIONS AND SESSION LAWS, Statutory Revisions, Compilations, Codes, Etc., And Constitutional Conventions of the United States and its possessions and of the several states to May, 1912
Boston State Library of Massachusetts 1912 First Edition Hardcover Very Good 
634+ pages; Blue library-style buckram binding with gilt lettering at spine, a specially bound copy interleaved with blank pages many of which have extensive annotations by the former owner Francis X. Dwyer regarding additions and corrections, some with vendors and prices. Also tipped-in to the interleaved blanks and laid-in are typed notes of additional materials located/acquired. Dwyer's name is written across top edge of text block and is also imprinted in gilt at the base of the spine. OCLC: 1863111 Francis X. Dwyer served in the Law Libraries at Harvard, and later, as librarian at the Law Library in the Library of Congress for decades, rising to Acting Law Librarian of Congress. Dwyer was also a lawyer, and he had the distinction of having been admitted to the Bar of the U.S. Supreme Court in 1939. He co-authored a widely used textbook: "Introduction to the Study of Law," by Edmund M. Morgan and Francis X. Dwyer. A unique working copy, including extensive material of interest to the history of law bibliography and scholarship. For example, at page 340 New York Bar Association, there are nine typed pages tipped in on the opposing blank page beginning with "The Laws and Acts of the General Assembly... of New York ... April, the 9th, Anno; Domini 1691 ... Printed 1694" with complete collation; etc. At the top of that first page of addenda is an ink note that reads: "encl. of letter 3/11/32 signed by A.J. Rosenbach" At page 212 is laid-in a two page typed letter on the letterhead of H.P. Kraus offering "The First Book copyrighted by Law in America" i.e., Massachusetts. The General Laws and Liberties - 1672; the letter bears manuscript notations: At the top "The LC copy is acc. to my records defective, lacks title-page and M 1-4." and in a different hand next to listing: "have too, one good copy checked with Mr. Dwyer to verify also. BB" There are notes and annotations on a vast majority of pages, including some historical price information, e.g., on page 456 under Session Laws, Public Laws of the State (1798) Printed by Carter and Wilkinson. Providence, 1798, pencil marginalia record 6 price points for that edition: "5 - M '13 / 4.50 - M '04 / 6 - H '17 / 3 - H '19 / 12 - AJH '29 / 8 - Stat '35" Opposite page 31 "Provisional laws and joint resolutions... Jefferson Territory... Omaha, 1860... [First book printed in Colorado] -- Hudson Book Co. Aug 1926 $3000 / John Vanmale Sept. 1931 $2000." Absolutely fascinating to those of us who are absolutely fascinated by such material. 
Price: 449.95 USD
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THE WORKS OF FRANCIS BACON, LORD CHANCELLOR OF ENGLAND in 16 Volumes Complete, A New Edition, Bacon, Francis; Basil Montagu
18 Bacon, Francis; Basil Montagu THE WORKS OF FRANCIS BACON, LORD CHANCELLOR OF ENGLAND in 16 Volumes Complete, A New Edition
London William Pickering 1825 New Edition Leather Bound Very Good+ 8vo 
Sixteen Volumes bound as 17 (Volume 16 bound in two parts), published consecutively from 1825 to 1834. Tan half calf over marbled boards with red and black title labels at spines with gilt lettering and extensive gilt tooling at spines; marbled endpapers. Bindings in very nice condition with some light rubbing. Volume 3 has some wear at head of spine, still quite attractive (see images); Volume 16, II has a scrape to leather on rear board. Engraved portrait frontispiece and facsimile letter in Volume 1; folding plan of 'Advancement of Learning' in Volume 2; engraved frontispiece portrait of Bacon in Volume 4; engraved frontispiece of St. Michael's Church in Volume 5; Engraved frontispiece of Monument to Lord Bacon in Volume 6; Frontispiece in Volume 7 has three images of Gorhameury; frontispiece in Volume 8; frontispiece facsimile letter in Volume 9. Volumes 1-3 and Volumes 9-11 were printed by "Thomas White, Printer,/Johnson's Court;" Volumes 4 - 8 printed by "Thomas White, Printer,/ Crane Court;" Volumes 12-16 printed by "C. Whittingham, Tooks Court/ Chancery Lane". Francis Bacon, 1st Viscount St. Alban (1561 – 1626) was an English philosopher, statesman, scientist, jurist and author. He served both as Attorney General and Lord Chancellor of England. After he left the political arena, he remained extremely influential through his writings, particularly his work on natural philosophy and the scientifi. Bacon has been called the creator of empiricism; introducing and popularising inductive methodologies for scientific inquiry. Additional shipping charge for this heavy multi-volume set. ; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
Price: 1649.95 USD
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What may be done to forward the judicious application of the principle of individualization of punishment by the judge who assigns the penalty to be inflicted on the offender?, Bates, Hon. Sanford
19 Bates, Hon. Sanford What may be done to forward the judicious application of the principle of individualization of punishment by the judge who assigns the penalty to be inflicted on the offender?
Chicago 1926 First Edition Paperback Very Good 8vo 
Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, Vol XVI, No. 4 (February 1926); 18 pages; Contents clean and tight in original printed wrappers, some faint indentations at top edge. "Reprinted from the Journal of criminal law and criminology, Vol. XVI - No. 4, Feb., 1926." (pp. [477]-494) OCLC: 80769929 Sanford Bates (1884-1982) served as the first Director of the Federal Bureau of Prisons (1930-1937), a subdivision of the United States Department of Justice. 
Price: 9.95 USD
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20 Bau, Mingchien Joshua MODERN DEMOCRACY IN CHINA
Shanghai Commercial Press, Ltd. 1924 Second Edition Hardcover Very Good 8vo 
x, 467 pages; Former owner's bookplate on front pastedown and names on ffep, otherwise clean and tight in original brown cloth binding with gilt lettering at spine and front cover. Minor wear to cloth at spine ends, some faint spotting to front board. This is the 1924 Second Edition of this thorough examination of the political and constitutional problems confronting the Chinese nation in the 1920s following the Revolution with conclusions addressing the drafting of a permanent constitution for the Republic of China. At the time China was passing abruptly from monarchical autocracy to repulican constitutionalism without any institutional foundations for the transition. Gripped by the anarchy, militarism, financial collapse and foreign influences following the Revolution, China was facing an unparalleled crisis. In response to the Washington Conference for the establishemnt and maintenance of a stable and effective Chinese government, this work endeavors to study the issues and concludes with a draft of the proposed permanent constitution for China with accomodations for workable government institutions and structure. The eight appendices include important Chinese constitutional documents from the Manchu dynasty to the early 1920s, including Constitutional Documents under the Manchu Regine, The Provisional Constitution, The Constitutional Compact, Memorandum on Government Systems by Dr. Frank J. Goodnow (Constitutional Advisor to the Chinese Government of President Yuan Shih-Kai, Dr. Goodnow's Constitution, The Draft of the National Constitution of 1917, and The Charter of Canton. ; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
Price: 139.95 USD
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