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MONEY IN THE BANK - How Safe Is It?, Abboud, A. Robert ; [Katharine Graham's Copy]
1 Abboud, A. Robert ; [Katharine Graham's Copy] MONEY IN THE BANK - How Safe Is It?
Homewood Irwin Professional Pub 1988 1556230702 / 9781556230707 First Edition Hardcover Near Fine in Near Fine dust jacket 8vo 8" - 9" tall Signed by Author
Autograph; 322 pages; Inscribed and SIGNED by the author on the ffep to Kay Graham. Katharine Graham (1917-2001) was the Publisher, and later, Chairman of the Board of the Washington Post Company. She was a noted Washington hostess, whose dinner table served so many of the powerful, influential and interesting people during their tenure in the Nation's Capitol. Former First Chicago Corp. CEO Bob Abboud describes what really goes on in the front office of a major bank and reviews how the banking system evolved and questions the safety of current banking practices.; Signed by Author; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
Price: 14.95 USD
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FEAR IN THE AIR -  Broadcasting and the First Amendment: the Anatomy of a Constitutional Crisis, Ashmore, Harry S. ; [Katharine Graham's Copy]
2 Ashmore, Harry S. ; [Katharine Graham's Copy] FEAR IN THE AIR - Broadcasting and the First Amendment: the Anatomy of a Constitutional Crisis
New York Norton 1973 0393083683 / 9780393083682 First Edition Hardcover Near Fine in Very Good dust jacket 8vo 8" - 9" tall Signed by Author
Autograph; 180 pages; Inscribed and SIGNED by the author on ffep "For Kay Graham -- who deserves a much higher accolade that the one contained herein -- HSA / Santa Barbara / October 1973." Katharine Graham (1917-2001) was the Publisher, and later, Chairman of the Board of the Washington Post Company. She was a noted Washington hostess, whose dinner table served so many of the powerful, influential and interesting people during their tenure in the Nation's Capitol. Harry Scott Ashmore (1916 – 1998) was an American journalist who won a Pulitzer Prize for his editorials in 1957 on the school integration conflict in Little Rock, Arkansas. Ashmore was first an editorial writer and eventually executive editor at the Arkansas Gazette in Little Rock, Arkansas. In 1958 the Arkansas Gazette won the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service during the school integration crisis of 1957. In the same year Harry Ashmore won the Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Writing, "For the forcefulness, dispassionate analysis and clarity of his editorials on the school integration conflict in Little Rock." This book on media and the First Amendment focuses on the attempts of the Nixon administration to stifle both print and broadcast media. The Washington Post and Katharine Graham were in the thick of this battle. A wonderful association copy. ; Signed by Author; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
Price: 74.95 USD
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Critical and Social Essays Reprinted from the New York Nation, Godkin, Edwin Lawrence ; et al.
3 Godkin, Edwin Lawrence ; et al. Critical and Social Essays Reprinted from the New York Nation
New York Leypoldt & Holt 1867 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Very Good+ 12mo 
iv, 230 & (4, ads) pages; Publisher's dark green cloth, with beveled edges to the boards, title lettered in gilt on the spine and front cover, gilt publisher's device at the foot of the spine. Chocolate brown endpapers. Essays from the New York Nation founded by the Irish-born American journalist and editor Edwin Lawrence Godkin (1831-1902). In planning the new weekly publication, E. L. Godkin was joined by fellow abolishionists Charles Eliot Norton and James Miller McKim, who helped gather contributions from many progressive writers of the period. Godkin remained editor of his "Nation" until the end of the year 1899, even though in 1881 he sold the Nation to the New York Evening Post. According to The Nation's founding prospectus of 1865, "The Nation will not be the organ of any party, sect, or body. It will, on the contrary, make an earnest effort to bring to the discussion of political and social questions a really critical spirit, and to wage war upon the vices of violence, exaggeration and misrepresentation by which so much of the political writing of the day is marred." The Nation is still in existence, after many difficulties, various owners, and anger directed towards it by various pillars of the establishment. It is now the oldest continuously published weekly magazine in the United States. The periodical, devoted to politics and culture, is self-described as "the flagship of the left." This handsome gathering of articles from the first 18 months of "The Nation" was published by Leypoldt & Holt, a firm founded in 1866 by Frederick Leypoldt and Henry Holt. Initially, this firm specialized in translations from foreign books. Indeed, almost simultaneously with this little book, the firm published the first English translation of Ivan Turgenev's "Fathers and Sons" (issued in a nearly identical format to this tidy volume). In fact, the two works appear, with one other, on a leaf of 'Seasonable New Books' included in the publisher's ads at the rear). In 1868, Leypoldt decided to devote his future efforts to bibliography. He founded the periodical that eventually became "Publisher's Weekly, and others. By 1873, the firm had become Henry Holt and Company. A splendid copy, tight, clean and sound, with the neat pencil signature of H. C. Angell dated 1868 on the front blank leaf. There are three tiny spots (of ink?) on the spine, but the binding is otherwise virtually unworn, even at the edges. ; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
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UN JOURNAL, UNE AVENTURE -  Des Relations avec le Pouvoir Ici et Ailleurs, Gombault, Charles ; [Signed to Katharine Graham]
4 Gombault, Charles ; [Signed to Katharine Graham] UN JOURNAL, UNE AVENTURE - Des Relations avec le Pouvoir Ici et Ailleurs
Paris Gallimard 1982 2070209733 / 9782070209736 First Edition Paperback Near Fine 8vo 8" - 9" tall Signed by Author
French Edition; Autograph; 210 pages; Inscribed and SIGNED by the AUTHOR on halftitle to Kay Grahame. Katharine Graham (1917-2001) was the Publisher, and later, Chairman of the Board of the Washington Post Company. She was a noted Washington hostess, whose dinner table served so many of the powerful, influential and interesting people during their tenure in the Nation's Capitol. Charles Henri Gombault was a major figure in modern French journalism. He began his career as a reporter for several newspapers, then became editor in chief and publisher of France-Soir, the Paris evening paper that he helped found with Pierre Lazeraff. France-Soir helped redefine French journalism; it was a lively, popular, political newspaper with a keen sense of the news and with correspondents stationed around the world. A wonderful association copy linking two of the most powerful newspaper people of the late 20th century. ; Signed by Author; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
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Littell's Living Age  [Cornelius Vanderbilt Jr.'s copy] No. 1428 - October 21, 1871, Littell, Eliakim ; (editor)
5 Littell, Eliakim ; (editor) Littell's Living Age [Cornelius Vanderbilt Jr.'s copy] No. 1428 - October 21, 1871
Boston Littell & Gay 1871 Softcover Very Good 8vo 
34 pages; An issue of the long-running and successful American magazine 'Littell's Living Age' -- which ran from 1844-1941. Bound volumes of Littell's are comparatively common -- this is a single issue in the original wrappers which contains wood-engraved small representations of twenty contemporary American and British magazines and journals -- (from which 'Littell's Living Age' extracted content every week). The wrappers are intact, but a bit scrappy at the lower edge. But the main interest in this particular issue centers on a tiny yellow printed slip pasted to the cover; this is the original address label, reading: "C Vanderbilt jr / 72 East 34th Street." On the day this magazine arrived in New York City, the sight of this terse, tiny label would have enraged the richest man in America -- Cornelius Vanderbilt [1794-1877]. The elder Cornelius, widely known as "The Commodore," built a huge fortune, first in steamships, and then in railroad companies. His favorite son had been George Washington Vanderbilt, who died before he was twenty-five from tuberculosis after serving for a time in the Union Army during the Civil War. The subscriber to whom this issue of 'Littell's' was sent, was Cornelius Jeremiah Vanderbilt [1830-1882]. The younger Cornelius V, known as as "Corneel," was the second son of the tycoon, and his wife, Sophia Johnson. From the age of eighteen, he suffered from epilepsy, which his tough father viewed as a sign of weakness. "He's a very smart fellow, but he's got a cog out," his father told friends. To toughen-up his 19 year old namesake, Commodore Vanderbilt sent his son out as a working crewman on a ship headed for San Francisco around Cape Horn. Corneel abandoned the ship when he arrived, ran out of money, and and tried to charge his expenses to his father. The Commodore viewed this as a sign of insanity, and had Corneel arrested on his return to New York in November of 1849 and committed to the Bloomingdale Lunatic Asylum until February 1850 for "dementia." Corneel developed a fondness for gambling, and debts he ran up chasing this pursuit prompted him to use his famous name and genuine charm to borrow money from friends and prominent people, often failing to repay these debts. He particularly relied on loans from Horace Greeley, a long-term friend and editor of the New York Tribune. The Commodore warned his business partners and acquaintances: "There is a crazy fellow running all over the land calling himself my son. If you come into contact with him, don't trust him." The elder Vanderbuilt took legal action to prohibit his son from presenting himself as "Cornelius Vanderbilt Jr." In fact, the Commodore is reported to have said of his troubled second son, "I'd give a hundred dollars not to have named him Cornelius." Once again, the elder Vanderbilt had his son arrested and confined in Bloomingdale Lunatic Asylum in January, 1854 -- on the grounds of "confusion" and "loose habits." The younger Cornelius's older brother William Vanderbilt told Corneel they were trying to get him committed to avoid criminal charges for forgery. To which explanation, Corneel is reported to have responded: "I would rather be considered a damn rascal than I would a lunatic." In any event, Corneel's doctor at Bloomingdale told his young involuntary patient -- "I am satisfied that you are no more crazy than I am. You may go home." Two years later, Corneel married an older woman, from Hartford, Connecticut. The elder Vanderbilt made a point of meeting the prospective bride and her parents. The Commodore inquired whether Miss Ellen Williams had jewels or an expensive wardrobe. He seemed pleased to get a response in the negative since, as he predicted, the younger Cornelius would merely purloin them and gamble away the proceeds. Ellen Williams was not easily deterred; she told her father and her prospective father-in-law that "I have a divine mission to save that young man." The Commodore became fond and respectful of Ellen, attended the wedding, and bought the couple a fruit farm near Hartford and increased his wayward son's allowance. As might have been predicted, some of Corneel's old habits were hard to break. In 1867 Corneel filed for personal bankruptcy. In 1872, both his wife Ellen and his friend and financial supporter Horace Greeley died. He lost interest in the farm and Commodore Vanderbilt, who still held the title to the Connecticut property, sold it. Corneel headed to Colorado and the west. When the Commodore died in 1877, he left the bulk of his 100 million dollar estate to William Henry Vanderbilt. Corneel and three of his sisters contested the will on the grounds that their father was of "unsound mind" and under the influence of his son Billy and of spiritualists he consulted on a regular basis. The court battle lasted more than a year and was ultimately won outright by Billy, who then increased the bequests to his siblings and paid their legal fees. Corneel subsequently re-purchased the West Hartford farm and house, and took a trip around the world. Upon his return, Corneel settled in the Glenham Hotel, thus finally taking residence on Fifth Avenue in New York City -- where his siblings and their children built a series of famed mansions. Corneel, on the other hand, spent the last evening of his life at a gambling house, and on the afternoon of April 2, 1882 -- he shot himself in the head in his hotel room. The next owner of the famous name: "Cornelius Vanderbilt" would be the son of his brother, William Vanderbilt (who lived only eight years after receiving his enormous inheritance). This nephew of Corneel's -- usually referred to as "Cornelius Vanderbilt II" -- built the largest of the family's several Fifth Avenue mansions (all now demolished) and the vast estate in Newport, Rhode Island known as "The Breakers" which still stands. If it matters, this 1871 issue of 'Little's Living Age' has a biographical article about the poet Wordsworth and an account of 'the Communists in London" -- from the Pall Mall Gazette, along with other similar content. 
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The Odoherty Papers By the Late William Maginn ( in Two Volumes ), Maginn, William ; Shelton Mackenzie, (Editor)
6 Maginn, William ; Shelton Mackenzie, (Editor) The Odoherty Papers By the Late William Maginn ( in Two Volumes )
New York Redfield 1855 First Edition Hardcover Very Good 8vo 
vii, 374 ; 383, (12 ads) pages; Former owner's names, otherwise clean and secure in two volumes, in original brown cloth bindings, front and rear boards have nested borders stamped in blind, gilt lettering at spines. Cloth worn and chipped at spine ends of both volumes and spine edge of Volume 2. William Maginn (1794 - 1842) was a journalist and miscellaneous writer, born at Cork, Ireland. In 1830, along with his friend Hugh Fraser, Maginn was one of the founders of and leading contributors to Fraser's Magazine. Though a brilliant periodical writer, Maginn left little permanent work behind him. by the time he reached his forties, he found himself in debtor's prison, but was soon released by grace of the Insolvent Debtor's Act. He died in extreme poverty of tuberculosis in August 1842. "For more than a quarter of a century the most remarkable magazine writer of his time was the late William Maginn, LL.D., well known as the 'Sir Morgan Odoherty' of Blackwood's Magazine, and as the principal contributor for many years to Fraser's, and other periodicals. The combined learning, wit, eloquence, eccentricity, and humour of Maginn had obtained for him, long before his death, the title of the modern Rabelais. His magazine articles possess extraordinary merit. He had the art of putting a vast quantity of animal spirits upon paper; but his graver articles — which contain sound and serious principles of criticism — are earnest and well-reasoned." [Dictionary of British and American Authors] 
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7 Minow, Newton N. ; John Bartlow Martin ; Lee M. Mitchell; [ W. Willard Wirtz ] PRESIDENTIAL TELEVISION {SIGNED by author]
New York Basic Books, Inc. 1973 First Edition Hardcover Near Fine in Near Fine dust jacket 8vo 
Autograph; 232 pages; Inscribed and Signed by Newton Minow on ffep to W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary of Labor for the last year of President Kennedy's administration and during President Lyndon Johnson 's administration and a speech writer for Adlai Stevenson during his presidential campaign. Clean and tight in original gray cloth in dustjacket. Newton Norman Minow (born January 17, 1926) is an American attorney and former Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission. His speech referring to television as a "vast wasteland" is cited even as the speech has passed its 50th anniversary. While still maintaining a law practice, Minow is currently the Honorary Consul General of Singapore in Chicago. Minow has been active in Democratic party politics. He is an influential attorney in private practice concerning telecommunications law and is active in many non-profit, civic, and educational institutions. Minow became one of the most well known and respected — if sometimes controversial — political figures of the early 1960s because of his criticism of commercial television. In a speech given to the National Association of Broadcasters convention on May 9, 1961, he was extremely critical of television broadcasters for not doing more, in Minow's view, to serve the public interest. His phrase, "vast wasteland", is remembered years after the speech after he said,“ When television is good, nothing — not the theater, not the magazines or newspapers — nothing is better. But when television is bad, nothing is worse. I invite each of you to sit down in front of your television set when your station goes on the air and stay there for a day without a book, without a magazine, without a newspaper, without a profit and loss sheet or a rating book to distract you. Keep your eyes glued to that set until the station signs off. I can assure you that what you will observe is a vast wasteland."; Signed by One Author; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
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8 Minow, Newton N. ; [ SIGNED ] ; Lawrence Laurent ; [ W. Willard Wirtz ] EQUAL TIME The Private Broadcaster and the Public Interest
New York Atheneum 1964 First Edition Hardcover Near Fine in Very Good dust jacket 8vo Signed by Author
Autograph; 316 pages; Inscribed and Signed by the author on ffep to Bill Wirtz -- W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary of Labor for the last year of President Kennedy's administration and during President Lyndon Johnson 's administration. Clean and tight in original tan cloth in dustjacket with some wear. Newton Norman Minow (born January 17, 1926) is an American attorney and former Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission. His speech referring to television as a "vast wasteland" is cited even as the speech has passed its 50th anniversary. While still maintaining a law practice, Minow is currently the Honorary Consul General of Singapore in Chicago. Minow has been active in Democratic party politics. He is an influential attorney in private practice concerning telecommunications law and is active in many non-profit, civic, and educational institutions. Minow became one of the most well known and respected — if sometimes controversial — political figures of the early 1960s because of his criticism of commercial television. In a speech given to the National Association of Broadcasters convention on May 9, 1961, he was extremely critical of television broadcasters for not doing more, in Minow's view, to serve the public interest. His phrase, "vast wasteland", is remembered years after the speech after he said,“ When television is good, nothing — not the theater, not the magazines or newspapers — nothing is better. But when television is bad, nothing is worse. I invite each of you to sit down in front of your television set when your station goes on the air and stay there for a day without a book, without a magazine, without a newspaper, without a profit and loss sheet or a rating book to distract you. Keep your eyes glued to that set until the station signs off. I can assure you that what you will observe is a vast wasteland."; Signed by Author; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
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Philadelphia 1683-1908 [whole issue of Collier's - The National Weekly October 10, 1908 ]   including  LETTERS OF A JAPANESE SCHOOLBOY (on Baseball), Oakley, Violet; Wallace Irwin (as "Hashimura Togo")
9 Oakley, Violet; Wallace Irwin (as "Hashimura Togo") Philadelphia 1683-1908 [whole issue of Collier's - The National Weekly October 10, 1908 ] including LETTERS OF A JAPANESE SCHOOLBOY (on Baseball)
New York P. F. Collier and Son 1908 Softcover Very Good Folio 
Collier's The National Weekly; A complete issue of Collier's Weekly, October 10, 1908 [vol. XLII, No. 3]. Generally well preserved, with just a trace of toning and dust to the covers, (and a short, closed tear to the rear wrapper, a full page ad for the Victor Talking Machine). This issue of Collier's Weekly was probably saved for its cover and story about the 225th anniversary celebration of Philadelphia as a city. The cover, by Guernsey Moore is bold with Colonial verve, and the text inside has small b/w illustrations of the floats designed for the parade by Violet Oakley, who spent nearly her whole working life as an artist in the vicinity of the city, after studying in New York and Europe, and with Howard Pyle. She was the first American woman to receive a public mural commission. Philadelphia went all out for this Founder's Week celebration in 1908 -- the largest pagent in the city since the 1876 Centennial celebrations. The organizer, historian Ellis Paxson Oberholtzer, hired Violet Oakley to design 68 floats to illustrate the whole range of the city's remarkable history. They were large, and necessity dictated that they were painted quickly and more freely than Oakley's important series of historical murals painted for the Pennsylvania State House. Eight of the large series of Violet Oakley's floats are shown in small photographs here, along with three photos of the celebration, all in b/w halftones. This issue also devoted a full page to one of Wallace Irwin's now-infamous "Letters of a Japanese Schoolboy," -- XXXVII: "America's Base Game of Ball." The installments of this series purport to have been written by a "thirty-five year old Japanese 'schoolboy' to the editor of Collier's. The series started in 1907 and was highly popular, to the extent that Irwin's pieces were gathered into a book in 1908. Among his fans in this false guise was Mark Twain, a blurb from whom graced Doubleday's advertisements for Irwin's book -- "Mark Twain Says: 'When is his (Hishimura Togo's) book coming out? He is the wisest and funniest and delightfulest creature that has been added to our literature for some time." Irwin went on to write three more Togo books, and in 1917 a silent film comedy was released -- ['Hashimura Togo' directed by William C. deMille (Cecil's older brother and father to Agnes de Mille) and starring the great Sessue Hayakawa.] Now, these books and the Collier's pieces like the one offered here, are studied and cited by scholars inquiring into the state of racism directed by American's towards the Japanese people. The subject of our example is, of all things, baseball -- or, as Irwin/Hashimura Togo called it: "America's Base Game of Ball." The multi-pane drawing at the head of this piece makes it clear why scholarly students of racism have turned a laser eye towards Wallace Irwin's "Hashimura Togo." It has to be said that the column is, indeed, funny (as well as being appalling). But the last laugh may be on Wallace Irwin; long before he died in 1959, baseball had become a huge success in Japan -- not a laughing matter at all. Of course, today, this fact is beyond dispute, as fans of the great Ichiro Suzuki can attest -- [for non baseball fans, Ichiro has more professional hits than any player in baseball history, if one counts his nine years with the Orix Blue Wave of Nippon Professional Baseball (NPB) in Japan, where he began his professional career, and adds the 3030 hits he has racked up (so far) in American Major League Baseball, playing for the Mariners, Yankees, and Marlins. He will, reportedly, play again for the Marlins in 2017. So, his record-smashing numbers will likely get even larger. This issue of Collier's also has appeal from full page ads for the "Chalmers-Detroit 30" -- ("No Other Car Like This for $1500; there is also a boxed inset depicting the senior model -- the Chalmers-Detroit 40, which was almost twice the price); and also the rear cover, for the Victor Talking Machine. The model Victor III is shown opposite a standing figure of the great operatic star Geraldine Farrar -- "Which is which?" 
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LITTLE LEADERS, Payne, William Morton
10 Payne, William Morton LITTLE LEADERS
Chicago A. C. McClurg 1902 First Edition Blue Cloth Very Good 8vo 
278 pages; Clean and tight in original lovely navy blue cloth binding with lettering and decorative in gilt in a pattern of stylized acorns. Stamp on tp "The Property of the Franklin Typographical Society." In this work Payne give us an interesting collection of essays on various topics divided into three sections: Literature and Criticism, Education, and In Memorium. Essays includ: The Ibsen Legend, The Writer and His Hire, Anonymity in LIterary Criticism, The Neglected Art of Translation, Democracy and Education, The Use and Abuse of Dialect, Reading and Educaiton, Alfred Tennyson, Ernest Renan, Hippolyte A. Taine, Gustav Freytag, John Addington Symonds, Christina Georgina Rossetti, etc. William Morton Payne (1858 - 1919) was an American educator, literary critic and writer. From 1874 to 1876 he was an assistant librarian in Chicago Public Library, after that he taught in a Chicago high school and worked as literary editor of the Chicago Morning News and then the Chicago Evening Journal. In 1892 he became an associate editor for The Dial, later lecturing on English literature at various universities in Wisconsin, Kansas and Chicago. He translated Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson's historical trilogy Sigurd Slembe and Henrik Bernhard Jaeger's biography of Henrik Ibsen from Norwegian.; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
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VARIOUS VIEWS, Payne, William Morton
11 Payne, William Morton VARIOUS VIEWS
Chicago A. C. McClurg 1902 First Edition Blue Cloth Very Good 12mo 
279 pages; Clean and tight in original navy blue cloth binding with lettering and decorative in gilt in a pattern of stylized acorns. A beautifully bound and interesting collection of essays on various topics: The Hugo Centenary, Alexander the Great, Shakespeare in France, International Amity, Hero-Worship, Duties of Authors, Architecture of the Mind, Revival of Romance, The Great American Novel, Newspaper Science, The decay of American Journalism, The New Patriotic Impulse, etc. William Morton Payne (1858 - 1919) was an American educator, literary critic and writer. From 1874 to 1876 he was an assistant librarian in Chicago Public Library, after that he taught in a Chicago high school and worked as literary editor of the Chicago Morning News and then the Chicago Evening Journal. In 1892 he became an associate editor for The Dial, later lecturing on English literature at various universities in Wisconsin, Kansas and Chicago. ; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
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One World to Share  Selected Speeches of the Commonwealth Secretary-General, Ramphal, Shridath ; [SIGNED to Katharine Graham ]
12 Ramphal, Shridath ; [SIGNED to Katharine Graham ] One World to Share Selected Speeches of the Commonwealth Secretary-General
London Hutchinson Benham 1979 0091399904 / 9780091399900 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Fine in Near Fine dust jacket 8vo Signed by Author
Autograph; xxxi, 444 pages; Publisher's blue cloth. Fine, in dust jacket. Inscribed by the author on the title page: "For Kay Graham / in friendship / [signed] S. Ramphal." The recipient was Katharine Graham [ 1917-2001] - Publisher, and later, Chairman of the Board of the Washington Post Company. The author, Sir Shridath Surendranath "Sonny" Ramphal had been Minister of Foriegn Affairs and Justice of Guyana. He then served as the second Commonwealth Secretary-General from 1975-1990. He was the first to serve in this significant post from the third world. During his tenure, a crucial issue came to dominate the work of the Commonwealth: the issue of economic sanctions against apartheid South Africa. The author's card as Secretary-General is laid in. ; Signed by Author; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
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THE SAINT ALBANS NEWS  Volume XXXIV, Numbers 1-12, St. Albans School ; Alfred Friendly, Jr. (editor)
13 St. Albans School ; Alfred Friendly, Jr. (editor) THE SAINT ALBANS NEWS Volume XXXIV, Numbers 1-12
Washington, DC: St. Albans School 1954 First Edition Hardcover Very Good Elephant Folio 23" tall 
52 pages; A run of all twelve issues of the Saint Albans News for the 1954-1955 academic year bound in tan boards with a blue cloth spine and gilt lettering at front board. Contents in very nice condition, clean and tight; the boards have some fading and stains. The Saint Albans News, the official student publication of St. Albans School, was founded in 1930 making it one of the oldest student newspapers in the country. Among the notable students of St. Albans are Al Gore, John Kerry, Neil Bush, Harold Ford, Jr., Gore Vidal and many Roosevelts. This bound volume covers the academic year in which St. Albans integrated; it was one of the earliest private schools in Washington to do so. In addition to the usual coverage of athletics and school government and administration, the paper presents news and commentary on the mid-term national elections, foreign affairs, book reviews, editorials, profiles of various students, etc. Alfred Friendly, Jr. served as editor-in-chief during the 1954-55 season, who later became a reporter with Newsweek and the New York Times. His father Alfred Friendly, Sr. (1911-1983) had started in journalism as a reporter with the Washington "Post" in 1939 and became the Post's Managing Editor in 1955; he played a major role in taking the 'Post' from a local paper to a journal of national and international importance. In 1967 he covered the Mideast War for the Post in a series of articles for which he won the Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting in 1968. 
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THE SAINT ALBANS NEWS  Volume XL, Numbers 1-9  (1960-1961), St. Albans School ; David L. Scull; Donald E. Graham
14 St. Albans School ; David L. Scull; Donald E. Graham THE SAINT ALBANS NEWS Volume XL, Numbers 1-9 (1960-1961)
Washington, DC: St. Albans School 1960 First Edition Hardcover Very Good Elephant Folio 23" tall 
38 pages; A run of all nine issues of the Saint Albans News for the 1960-1961 academic year bound in tan boards with a blue cloth spine and gilt lettering at front board. Endpapers have red markings, but all contents in very nice condition, clean and tight; the boards have some fading and stains. The Saint Albans News, the official student publication of St. Albans School, was founded in 1930 making it one of the oldest student newspapers in the country. Among the notable students of St. Albans are Al Gore, John Kerry, Neil Bush, Harold Ford, Jr., Gore Vidal and many Roosevelts. In addition to the usual coverage of athletics and school government and administration, the paper presents news and commentary on national politics, foreign affairs, book reviews, editorials, profiles of various students, etc. David L. Scull served as editor-in-chief during the 1960-61 season. As incoming editor-in-chief for the next academic year, Donald E. Graham edited the last issue of this volume (May 26, 1961) -- an editorial debut for this noted journalist and publisher. At the time of Graham's selection as editor-in-chief, his father Philip Graham was publisher and president of The Washington Post Company. Donald Graham later joined The Washington Post as a reporter, and went on to hold various news and business positions at the Post and Newsweek. He was made executive vice president and general manager of the Post in 1976. Donald Graham became publisher of The Washington Post in 1979, succeeding his mother Katharine Graham. 
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THE SAINT ALBANS NEWS  Volume XXXV, Numbers 1-12, St. Albans School ; Jonathan Friendly (editor)
15 St. Albans School ; Jonathan Friendly (editor) THE SAINT ALBANS NEWS Volume XXXV, Numbers 1-12
Washington, DC: St. Albans School 1955 First Edition Hardcover Very Good Elephant Folio 23" tall 
50 pages; A run of all twelve issues of the Saint Albans News for the 1955-1956 academic year bound in tan boards with a blue cloth spine and gilt lettering at front board. Contents in very nice condition, clean and tight; the boards have some fading and stains. Inscribed on ffep and signed by W. Stanfield Johnson (News Editor) and J. Kirkwood White (Lower School Editor). The Saint Albans News, the official student publication of St. Albans School, was founded in 1930 making it one of the oldest student newspapers in the country. Among the notable students of St. Albans are Al Gore, John Kerry, Neil Bush, Harold Ford, Jr., Gore Vidal and many Roosevelts. In addition to the usual coverage of athletics and school government and administration, the paper presents news and commentary on national politics, foreign affairs, book reviews, editorials, profiles of various students, etc. There is a brief opinion piece decrying the verdict in the trial for the murder of Emmett Louis Till. Succeeding his brother Alfred Friendly, Jr., Jonathan Friendly served as editor-in-chief during the 1955-56 season. Jonathan later worked for the Detroit Jewish News and Jewish Renaissance Media until his retirement in 2005. His father Alfred Friendly, Sr. (1911-1983) had started in journalism as a reporter with the Washington "Post" in 1939 and became the Post's Managing Editor in 1955; he played a major role in taking the 'Post' from a local paper to a journal of national and international importance. In 1967 he covered the Mideast War for the Post in a series of articles for which he won the Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting in 1968. 
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AWAKENING FROM HISTORY, Taylor, Edmond ; [SIGNED to Katharine Graham]
16 Taylor, Edmond ; [SIGNED to Katharine Graham] AWAKENING FROM HISTORY
Cambridge Harvard Common Press 1969 0876450168 / 9780876450161 First Edition Hardcover Near Fine in Very Good+ dust jacket 8vo 8" - 9" tall Signed by Author
Autograph; Inscribed and Signed by the author to Katharine Graham -- publisher, and later, Chairman of the Board of the Washington Post Company. Clean and tight in original binding in very good dust jacket. In 1939 Edmond Taylor's book The Strategy of Terror was published; it described Hitler deployment of a fifth column throughout the Western world to desseminate propaganda to counter resistance to Nazi expansionism. Shortly after the book appeared, Ernest Cuneo of the British Security Coordination (BSC) approached Taylor and other sympathetic journalists to form their own fifth column to the campaign against Nazi sympathizers and "Britain's enemies in America." In his autobiography Awakening from History, Taylor write: "The propaganda wing, called the Foreign Information Service, was to be headed by Robert E. Sherwood, the noted playwright and one of President Roosevelt's most talented speech writers. I knew Sherwood slightly, from some of the overlapping interventionist committees with which we were both connected, and admired him greatly." Later during World War II, Taylor served on the planning board of the Office of Strategic Services (1942-1946). In 1943, he served as a Navy commander in the North African Theater, and then, until 1946 as a member of Lord Louis Mountbatten’s staff in the South East Asia Command. Taylor was awarded the Bronze Star. Between 1948 and 1953, Taylor worked for UNESCO, the Council on Foreign Relations, the Office of Public Affairs for HICOG, and served as Assistant Director for Office of Plans and Policy for the Psychological Strategy Broad. In 1954, Taylor became chief European correspondent of The Reporter magazine and wrote a weekly column for a number of American newspapers, including Katharine Graham's Washington Post. ; Signed by Author; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
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ASTIR - A Publisher's Life-Story, Thayer, John Adams ; [SIGNED]
17 Thayer, John Adams ; [SIGNED] ASTIR - A Publisher's Life-Story
Boston Small, Maynard & Company 1910 First Edition Hardcover Very Good+ 12mo 7" - 7½" tall Signed by Author
Autograph; 302 pages; Inscribed and SIGNED by the AUTHOR on ffep -- "To Louis A. Coolidge / A co-worker on / newspaper days / With the compliments of / John Adams Thayer / New York / January 10, 1911" OCLC: 302453 Clean and tight in original brown cloth binding with decorative stamping in gilt and red and lettering in gilt at spine and front cover. According to a contemporary review in the New York Times: "The book is one of those illuminated parables of success furnished by the lives of so many American business men. ... It is a good book for young men to read, for almost every chapter is an object lesson in how to get on in business in legitimate ways." Thayer worked his way up from printer to editor with stints at several magazine publishing houses including The Ladies' Home Journal (Cyrus H.K. Curtis), Munsey's, The Delineator, etc. He waged a lengthy and successful campaign for honest advertising, rejecting objectionable material of all sorts including that which was extravagantly phrased or promised unlikely results, particularly patent medicines. Thayer finally achieved the position of publisher when he and Erman J. Ridgway acquired Everybody's. They were astute in enlisting Thomas W. Lawson to write his series of articles titled "Frenzied Finances." Everybody's became a great success and was eventually sold to Butterick Company for $3,000,000 in 1910. ; Signed by Author; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
Price: 29.95 USD
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THE PLUME: A Tuft of Literary Feathers, Warland, John H.
18 Warland, John H. THE PLUME: A Tuft of Literary Feathers
Boston Benjamin B. Mussey 1847 Hardcover Very Good+ 8vo 
311 pages; Wright 2670. Quite a nice example. Clean and tight in original brown cloth binding with gilt lettering at spine and decorative blindstamping to boards; humourous frontispiece illustration. Small chip to cloth at top corner of spine, rubbed at lover corner of front board, light scattered foxing. OCLC: 2919711 An anthology of more than fifty pieces by Warland - both prose and poetry. John H. Warland (1807-1872) was a native of Cambridge, Mass., and a graduate of Harvard College. He studied theology but never was ordained as a preacher; instead he turned to writing. Warland wrote some fine poetry and was editor of the National Eagle (Claremont ) for seven years, during which time his young wife died. After that he moved to Manchester to be editor of The American, followed by editorship of The Journal in Lowell, MA; and an association with The Atlas in Boston. Warland succombed to insanity for the last twenty years of his life, and died at an asylum in Taunton, Mass. ; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
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Corrected Proofs, Weld, H. Hastings
19 Weld, H. Hastings Corrected Proofs
Boston Russell, Shattuck & Co. 1836 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Very Good 12mo 
261 & [1, errata] pages; Publisher's binding: an unusual medium brown cloth with fine vertical ribbing and an all-over pattern of mixed symbol-like design. The covers each have an elaborate decorative frame impressed in blind, the spine has the title stamped in gilt in all capital letters. Plain endpapers, wood-engraved vignette (the author?) on title page depicting an editor holding a sheet titled "Corrected Proofs", just off the press. A well-preserved copy, the original binding is unworn and intact at the delicate spine ends. The endpapers and the entire text block are foxed, with moderate browning to the title page and the first few leaves. OCLC: 2344408 Horatio Hastings Weld (1811-1888)) was an American author and newspaper editor. His work appeared mainly in periodicals and newspapers, especially "Brother Jonathan" and the "Evening Tattler" in New York. Weld dedicated his book, on a leaf just following the title, "To the Readers and Friends of the periodicals to which he has been a contributor." Weld started out as a craftsman printer and eventually edited newspapers in Lowell, New York, and Philadelphia. In 1845 Weld took orders in the Protestant Episcopal Church. He became rector successively of St. James Church of Downingtown, Pennsylvania, Trinity Church of Morristown, New Jersey, and Christ Church, of Riverton, New Jersey. He received the Doctorate of Sacred Theology from Andalusia College, in 1868. Some of Dr. Weld’s numerous later books include: The Women of the Scriptures (1848); Life of Christ (1850); and Sacred and Poetical Quotations (1851), and a life of Benjamin Franklin. He died in Riverton, New Jersey on August 27, 1888. Most remarkably, this early book of H. Hastings Weld acquired at least one active reader who wrote the author a fan letter of sorts, seeking, even, an autograph! This was Weld's fellow writer for the magazines, Edgar Allan Poe, who wrote the following letter to Weld in 1841: "Philadelphia, August 14, 1841 Dear Sir: —The proprietor of a weekly paper in this city is about publishing an article (to be written partly by myself) on the subject of American Autography. The design is three-fold: first, to give the Autograph signature — that is, a fac-simile in woodcut — of each of our most distinguished literati; second, to maintain that the character is, to a certain extent, indicated by the chirography; and thirdly, to embody, under each Autograph, some literary gossip about the individual, with a brief critical comment on his writings. My object in addressing you now is to request that you would favor me with your own Autograph, in a reply to this letter. I would be greatly obliged to you, also, could you make it convenient to give me a brief summary of your literary career. We are still in want of the Autographs of Sprague, Hoffman, Dawes, Bancroft, Emerson, Whittier, R. A. Locke, and Stephens, the traveller. If among your papers you have the Autographs of either of these gentlemen (the signature will suffice), and will permit me to have an engraving taken from it, I will endeavor to reciprocate the obligation in any manner which you may suggest. Should you grow weary, at any time, of abusing me in the “Jonathan” for speaking what no man knows to be truth better than yourself, it would give me sincere pleasure to cultivate the friendship of the author of “Corrected Proofs.” In the meantime, I am Very respy. Yours, Edgar A. Poe." Subsequently to this remarkable letter, Poe wrote the following about Weld in his "A Chapter on Autography" (part II): "Mr. WELD is well known as the present working editor of the New York "Tattler" and "Brother Jonathan." His attention was accidentally directed to literature about ten years ago, after a minority, to use his own words, "spent at sea, in a store, in a machine shop, and in a printing-office." He is now, we believe, about thirty-one years of age. His deficiency of what is termed regular education would scarcely be gleaned from his editorials, which, in general, are unusually well written. His "Corrected Proofs" is a work which does him high credit, and which has been extensively circulated, although "printed at odd times by himself, when he had nothing else to do." His MS. resembles that of Mr. Joseph C. Neal in many respects, but is less open and less legible. His signature is altogether much better than his general chirography." I should state that the printers slug of a standard Boston firm appears on the verso of the title page - "Waverly Press, Alfred Mudge, Printer." But this observation is not necessarily inconsistent with Poe's assertion that Weld set the type for his book, at least in part. This copy of "Corrected Proofs" has no marks, apart from a brief pencil mark almost certainly made by a bookseller at the time of publication (two greek letters - a code? - and a price of 1.00 net). One wonders where Poe's copy of "Corrected Proofs" is now? ; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
Price: 124.95 USD
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