The Antiquarian Book Shop

Quick Search

Author
Title
Description
Keyword
Advanced Search
 
 
 
 

Native American

Native American

Click on Title to view full description

 
Atightughyuggaaghusit / The First Reader, Aghnaghaghpik [Adelinda Womkon Badten]
1 Aghnaghaghpik [Adelinda Womkon Badten] Atightughyuggaaghusit / The First Reader
Fairbanks University of Alaska 1974 First Edition Paperback Very Good 4to 
First printing limited to 500 copies. Contents clean and secure in original yellow pictorial wrappers, light toning to wrappers. An instructional book for Yupik languages. OCLC Number16007521. 
Price: 14.94 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Journal Historique Et Politique Des Principaux Événements Des Différentes Cours de L'Europe  including "Traite de paix entre l'Angleterre & les Caraïbes de l'isle Saint-Vincent", Anonymous
2 Anonymous Journal Historique Et Politique Des Principaux Événements Des Différentes Cours de L'Europe including "Traite de paix entre l'Angleterre & les Caraïbes de l'isle Saint-Vincent"
Genève [but probably Paris] Ch.- J. Panckoucke 1773 First Edition Hardcover Very Good 12mo 
On offer here is an attractive volume in 18th century full calf, bound in the French style, (flat spine with floral tools in gilt, red label lettered in gilt, marbled endpapers, edges decoratively stained red). The volume in which these interesting numbers of the now-scarce 'Journal Historique Et Politique Des Principaux Événements Des Différentes Cours de L'Europe' is in a handsome contemporary binding which shows only minor rubbing -- mostly along the hinges, apart from some moderate fraying and loss at the corners and erosion of the top cap of the spine, exposing the headband. The original swirl-marbled endpapers are intact and the inner hinges are tight and secure; the sewing is sound and tight throughout. There are scattered brown marks and paper flaws, reflecting the mediocre quality of the paper selected for this journal, which was hardly expected to last for 240 years. This volume contains issues 10-18 of the interesting periodical "Journal Historique Et Politique Des Principaux Événements Des Différentes Cours de L'Europe," covering events of April-June of 1773. This journal was published every 10 days for the active Parisian publisher and bookseller Charles-Joseph Panckoucke. One of the "différentes Cours de L'Europe" in which events were covered extensively was London, with pages of details of goings on in England and its colonies offered in each issue. There is an unusually detailed account, with full text (in French) of a significant treaty signed by a representative of King George III: "Traite de paix entre l'Angleterre & les Caraïbes de l'isle Saint-VIncent." This appears on pp. 45-48 of Numero 12 -- issued 30 Avril, 1773. The treaty is presented as having been agreed to on the 17th "de ces mois," and so it is very much in the category of breaking news. This treaty is now fairly (but undeservedly) obscure, but the situation it attempted to settle grew out of one famous treaty, from ten years before and it proved to be a fascinating precursor to another more famous treaty, signed ten years later. In one of the lesser re-assignments of the territories of the world effected by the 1763 Treaty of Paris at the conclusion of the Seven Years' War -- Britain was awarded the right to rule over the Caribbean island of Saint Vincent. The island's history, of course, is much older; native American Arawak and Carib tribes settled over several centuries on a number of islands in the Lesser Antilles including St.Vincent. The Arawaks arrived around 100AD, and the Caribs about a thousand years later. The Caribs, more organized and aggressive, subdued and absorbed the culture of the Arawaks. Shortly after the first British claim on Saint Vincent in 1627, two Dutch ships carrying captured Nigerians destined for slavery were shipwrecked in 1635 off the coast of St. Vincent. Some of the Africans were able to swim ashore and find shelter in the Carib villages. This population of Africans and their descendants was augmented over the years, including in 1675 when a ship carrying British settlers and their slaves was shipwrecked between St. Vincent and Bequia. Only the slaves survived the shipwreck and they also came to live and mix with the native mixed Carib-Arawak population. A certain number of escaped slaves from nearby Barbados, Grenada and St. Lucia also added to the African-Carib population. After some friction, and even wars, eventually the native Caribs and the newer African arrivals merged and blended their cultures. British settlers distinguished them as "Black Caribs" and "Red (or yellow) Caribs. The "Black" people so-designated by outsiders preferred to call themselves Garifuna. Throughout some of this period, there were French settlers who arrived with the intention of making their living as planters. They seemed to get along with the native population with less friction, but the British land owners seemed united in their desire to form large plantations and to run the Caribs off the most desireable land. They tried to buy the land, tried military action with the minor forces available, but the "Black" Caribs resisted both efforts. The British raised the stakes by sending Major General William Dalrymple, with troops borrowed from around the Caribbean and augmented by two regiments which were sent from North America (Dalrymple himself had been dispatched from Boston, where he had technically been in command of troops involved in the Boston Massacre, although he himself had not been present). Despite his best efforts, Dalrymple was unable to subdue the resisting Caribs, led by the now-legendary Chief Joseph Chatoyer -- who knew the windward side of the islands and the hills far better than any of their combantants. In February, opponents of the Government of Lord North raised objections in Parliament, and obtained votes which compelled the British Government to end the fighting and secure peace on the best terms possible. The French language text offered here appears to be a word for word version of the 24 articles of the English treaty published in the 'Saint Vincent Gazette' of 27 February 1773. One article, number VIII, is of extraordinary interest concerning Slavery and the trade (which would continue in the British possessions for nearly another sixty years). The heart of this article requires that Runaway Slaves in the possession of the Caribs are to be given up, that efforts must be made to discover and capture others, and it must be agreed that no future efforts to encourage, receive or harbour other slaves shall be made, under the penalty of fortiture of lands. Finally, it was stated that removal of Slaves from the Island constituted a Capital crime. The Caribs were required to pledge allegiance to King George III, but were made British subjects (which gave legal standing to enforce article VIII, of course). In return, the British ceded a well-defined portion of the Island to the Caribs -- (called the prettiest and most fertile part of the land by at least one subsequent scholar). Thus concluded the first Anglo-Carib War. This treaty did not endure for the ages... During three days in June of 1779, French ships fighting on behalf of the Revolutionaries in (North) America quickly took possession of Saint Vincent (with the assistance of Joseph Chatoyer and the "Black Caribs"). But in the Treaty of Versailles which was an ancillary treaty to the Treaty of Paris 1783 by which Britain also recognized the end of the American Revolutionary War saw the British restored as sovereigns over Saint Vincent. Relations between the British and their once-again subjects, the Caribs, disintegrated. The situation brought about a second Anglo-Carib war (1794-6), once again led by Joseph Chatoyer. As in the first war, the Caribs gave the British forces all they could manage for over a year, but after the death in battle of Chatoyer on March 14, 1795, the end seemed inevitable, although fighting raged throughout St. Vincent over the next year with both sides sustaining heavy losses. The final battle took place at Vigie on June 10th, 1796. After a night of arduous fighting the Caribs approached the British with a truce flag. The victorious British then did a remarkable thing, which has repercussions lasting throughout the Caribbean and extending to South and North America through the present time. They sorted the 5000 Caribs who surrendered, separating the darkest skinned individuals, and those with the most "African" features, from the "Yellow Caribs." This darkest majority of the so-called Black Caribs were first sent to Balliceaux in the Grenadines and then on to Bequia. Eventually, in 1797 the survivors were transported hundreds of miles to the island of Roatan off the Honduran coast in Central America. This extraordinary settlement has permanently affected the modern populations of Belize, Guatemala, Nicaragua, and Honduras. The 1773 treaty offered in its French version here, may have become moot in just over six years, but it will stand forever as the first time that Britain was compelled by military force to negociate a treaty as equals with indiginous citizens of the New World. The incident has lasting imporance to African American history, and the lamentable history of the Slave Trade. (There is even a painting which records the negotiations for the treaty -- commissioned of the itinerant artist Agostino Brunias by Sir William Young, a major landowner on Saint Vincent, who became governor of Dominica; lithographs based on the painting were sold). Of course, there is much other news from all over Europe in these pages, including an interesting account from the future United States with details of the grant of land to Phineas Lyman and some of his fellow veterans of the French and Indian Wars. General Lyman was the most experienced American soldier of the period prior to the Revolution. He moved to England after 1762 and spent the next nine years petitioning for a grant of land in the newly established colony of West Florida. A tract near Natchez (now Mississippi) was granted by royal charter in 1772. Lyman led a band of settlers to the region in 1773 -- (see pp. 42-3 of Numero 11, 20 Avril, 1773). There is much in these pages about the troubles of the East India Company, and the Wilkes affair, as well. And, finally, there is an account of a significant incident in the tensions which moved events towards the American Revolution. Colonial Governor of Massachusetts Thomas Hutchinson, in a speech to the assembly, argued that either the colony was wholly subject to Parliament, or that it was effectively independent. The Boston Provincial Assembly's response, authored by John Adams, Samuel Adams, and Joseph Hawley, countered that the colonial charter granted autonomy -- and was described in an account on pages 39-40 of Numero 13, 10 Mai, 1773. 
Price: 949.99 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
WHITE HOUSE TRAIL GUIDE, Association, Southwest Parks and Monuments
3 Association, Southwest Parks and Monuments WHITE HOUSE TRAIL GUIDE
Canyon de Chelly Southwest Parks and Monuments Ass c1955 Pamphlet Very Good 
No date , but no zipcodes on address. A pamphlet guide to the archeological remains known as the White House in Canyon de Chelly, Arizona. Wrappers rubbed at edges. OCLC: 31364333 ; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
Price: 5.94 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
4 Bandelier, A.F. Papers of the Archeological Institute of America American Series III: Final Report of Investigations Among the Indians of the Southwestern United States, Carried on Mainly in the Years From 1880 to 1885 (Pt.1)
Cambridge [Massachusetts] John Wilson and Son 1890 First Edition Hardcover Very Good 8vo 
vi, [2] & 323 pages; Ex-Library of Congress Copy with "Surplus-Duplicate" stamp on the front free endpaper, bound for them in slate-grey stiff boards with maroon buckram spine, patterned endpapers. Marks consist of two small paper labels mounted to the spine, small perforated "LC" stamps at foot of title page (and bottom margin of pp. 99-100), pencilled class and shelfmarks on verso of title page. Part 1 only (Part 2 was published in 1892). With six full-page b/w illustrations in half-tones and a double-page map of N.E. Sonora and N.W. Chihuahua, by H. Hartman, at end. A clean copy, sewing sound. Ethnographic condition of the Southwest [of America] in the Sixteenth Century; and Present Condition of the Indian Tribes. The author, Adolph Francis Alphonse Bandelier (1840 –1914) was a pioneering American archaeologist after whom Bandelier National Monument in New Mexico was named. The pair of volumes Bandelier published with the Papers of the Archeological Institue of America, of which this is the first, were the culmination of his studies in Sonora (Mexico), Arizona and New Mexico. After 1892, Bandelier moved his ethnological and archaeological field of study to Ecuador, Bolivia and Peru. 
Price: 44.94 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
An Indian Sorcerer Performing His Ceremonies Over the Sick [ Hand-colored wood engraving ], Brownell, Charles de Wolf
5 Brownell, Charles de Wolf An Indian Sorcerer Performing His Ceremonies Over the Sick [ Hand-colored wood engraving ]
Hartford American Publishing Company 1852 Engraving Very Good 4" X 5 1/4" 
Wood Engraving; 1 pages; Interesting hand-colored wood engraving from Charles de Wolf Brownell’s The Indian Races of North and South America. Image measures 4" X 5 1/4" (14" x 11" matted). Matted in white stock with clear mylar. "Among the important personages in nearly every tribe upon the American Continent, except those whose habits have been changed by civilization, are the 'pow-wows,' as they were termed in New England, whose incantations were used to relieve the sick and wounded, or to secure success in war and other public undertakings.' 
Price: 14.94 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
An Interview of Samoset with the Pilgrims [ Hand-colored wood engraving ], Brownell, Charles de Wolf
6 Brownell, Charles de Wolf An Interview of Samoset with the Pilgrims [ Hand-colored wood engraving ]
Hartford American Publishing Company 1852 Engraving Very Good 4" x 4" 
Wood Engraving; 1 pages; Interesting hand-colored wood engraving from Charles de Wolf Brownell’s The Indian Races of North and South America. Image measures 4" x 4" (14" x 11" matted). Matted in white stock with clear mylar. Samoset (c. 1590–c. 1653) of the Abenaki people was the first Native American to greet the English Pilgrims at Plymouth and to introduce them to the Wampanoag chief Massasoit. 
Price: 14.94 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Indian War Dance [ Hand-colored wood engraving ], Brownell, Charles de Wolf
7 Brownell, Charles de Wolf Indian War Dance [ Hand-colored wood engraving ]
Hartford American Publishing Company 1852 Engraving Very Good 6" x 4" 
Wood Engraving; 1 pages; Interesting hand-colored wood engraving from Charles de Wolf Brownell’s The Indian Races of North and South America. Image measures 6" x 4" (14" x 11" matted). Matted in white stock with clear mylar. from page 511 of "The Indian Races of North and South America" by Charles De Wolf Brownell, 1853. Many tribes practiced a War Dance on the evening before an attack to observe certain religious rites to ensure success. The warriors took part in a war dance while contemplating retaliation and the dance stirred emotions and filled the braves with a profound sense of purpose as they prepared for battle. Though the ceremonies varied from one tribe to another, there are common points among many including singing, often extending over an entire day and night, interspersed with prayers, handling of sacred objects or bundles, and occasional dancing. Often a sweat lodge or other purification ceremony was also held, incense burned, faces might be painted, and a pipe was frequently passed between the participants. Generally, the only musical instruments used in these ceremonies are rattles, drums, and whistles. In the Pacific Northwest, the Pueblos of the Southwest, and the Iroquois of the Woodlands, participants often were dressed and masked to represent the various gods or supernatural creatures and who acted out parts of the ritual. 
Price: 14.94 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Tisquantum, or Squanto, The Guide and Interpreter of the Colonists [ Hand-colored wood engraving ], Brownell, Charles de Wolf
8 Brownell, Charles de Wolf Tisquantum, or Squanto, The Guide and Interpreter of the Colonists [ Hand-colored wood engraving ]
Hartford American Publishing Company 1853 Engraving Very Good 7" X 4 1/4" 
Wood Engraving; 1 pages; Interesting hand-colored wood engraving from Charles de Wolf Brownell’s The Indian Races of North and South America. Image measures 7" X 4 1/4" (14" x 11" matted). Matted in white stock with clear mylar. Tisquantum (c. 1585 – 1622), whose is commonly known as Squanto, was one of the last of the Patuxet, a Native North American people living on the western coast of Cape Cod Bay, who were annihilated by an epidemic infection. Squanto was an early liaison between the native populations in Southern New England and the Mayflower settlers, who made their settlement at the site of Squanto's former summer village. He acted as a translator, guide and advisor to them during the 20 months he lived with them. He showed them how to sow and fertilize native crops, a boon when it turned out that the crop from the seeds they brought largely failed, and introduced them to the fur trade, an important means by which they could reduce their indebtedness to their London financial backers. 
Price: 19.94 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
FLOW, Bruchac, Joseph
9 Bruchac, Joseph FLOW
Austin Cold Mountain 1975 0915496003 / 9780915496006 First Edition Stiff Wrappers Near Fine 
23 pages; Clean and secure in original printed wrappers. One of a limited edition of only 700 copies. OCLC: 1386109 For over thirty years Joseph Bruchac has been creating poetry, short stories, novels, anthologies and music that reflect his Abenaki Indian heritage and Native American traditions.; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
Price: 14.94 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
THERE ARE NO TREES INSIDE THE PRISON, Bruchac, Joseph
10 Bruchac, Joseph THERE ARE NO TREES INSIDE THE PRISON
Brunswick Blackberry Press 1978 First Edition Stiff Wrappers Near Fine 
Clean and secure in original printed wrappers, front wrapper faintly toned at top edge. OCLC: 21739212 Typed poem titled "Bravado" laid in with manuscript note at bottom -- "Pop! do you like this?" For over thirty years Joseph Bruchac has been creating poetry, short stories, novels, anthologies and music that reflect his Abenaki Indian heritage and Native American traditions.; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
Price: 34.94 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Massacre at Fort Mimms Hand Colored Steel Engraving, Chappel, Alonzo ; (John Rogers)
11 Chappel, Alonzo ; (John Rogers) Massacre at Fort Mimms Hand Colored Steel Engraving
New York Johnson, Fry and Company 1860 Engraving Very Good 5 5/8" x 7 1/8" 
1 pages; Excellent 19th Century steel engraving with modern hand coloring, depicting Massacre at Fort Mimms, an attack on settlers and allied Native Americans on August 30, 1813, by the Red Stick faction of the Creeks. Public outcry sparked the initial military action against the Creek Nation that would usher in the Creek War of 1813-14. Beautifully engraved (perhaps by John Rogers) after an original painting by Alonzo Chappel (1828-1887). Image measures 5 5/8" x 7 1/8" (14" x 11" matted). Clean sharp nicely colored image, matted in white stock with clear mylar. "In the summer of 1813, indications of hostility appeared among the surrounding Indians, which induced the inhabitants, to the amount of three hundred, to collect at fort Mimms. At eleven o'clock in the forenoon of the 30th of August, a body of six hundred Indians issued from the adjoining wood, and advanced within a few rods of the fort before they were discovered. The sentinel cried out "Indian;" they gave the war whoop and rushed in at the gate before the garrison had time to shut it. This decided its fate. Major Beasly, the commanding officer, was mortally wounded, carried into the house and consumed in the flames. The buildings were burned, and the garrison and the inhabitants burned or massacred; but seventeen of the whole number escaped. The battle and massacre lasted until six in the afternoon, a great part of the time without any show of resistance, by which time the work of destruction was fully completed; the fort and buildings demolished, and upwards of four hundred men, women and children, destroyed. Exemplary vengeance was taken on the Creeks for this outrage. A series of brilliant victories achieved by the neighboring militia, under the command of General Jackson, terminated on the 27th of March, 1814, in the slaughter of the remnant of the Creek warriors, and the submission of the nation. Two thousand'of their warriors were slain, most of their towns burned, and their strong holds occupied by the United States troops." 
Price: 29.94 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Dating the Tiwanaku State  in CHUNGARA  Revista De Antropologia Chilena - Volume 36, No. 1 (2004), Cologero M. Santoro Vargas
12 Cologero M. Santoro Vargas Dating the Tiwanaku State in CHUNGARA Revista De Antropologia Chilena - Volume 36, No. 1 (2004)
Arica, Chile Universidad de Tarapaca 2004 First Edition Paperback Near Fine 4to 11" - 13" tall 
Former owner's stamp on titlpage, otherwise clean and tight in original glossy decorative wrappers. Published in 2004. Articles include: Homenaje a Don Luis Alvarez Miranda; Dating the Tiwanaku State by Szymon Augustyniak; Arte Rupestre del Rio Grande, Cuenca del Rio Limari, Norte Chico, Chile; La Revista de Codpa (Altos de Arica) de 1772-73; Recursos Hidricos Altoandinos, Estrategias de Desarrollo Economico y Proyectos de Riego: Tarapaca, 1880-1930; El Mundo Andino, Poblacion, Medio Ambiente y Economia de John V. Murra; etc. 
Price: 10.94 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
La Revista de Codpa (Altos de Arica) de 1772-73 in CHUNGARA  Revista De Antropologia Chilena - Volume 36, No. 1 (2004), Cologero M. Santoro Vargas
13 Cologero M. Santoro Vargas La Revista de Codpa (Altos de Arica) de 1772-73 in CHUNGARA Revista De Antropologia Chilena - Volume 36, No. 1 (2004)
Arica, Chile Universidad de Tarapaca 2004 First Edition Paperback Near Fine 4to 11" - 13" tall 
Published in 2004. Former owner's stamp on titlpage, otherwise clean and tight in original glossy decorative wrappers. Upper rear corner creased of last few leaves. Articles include: Homenaje a Don Luis Alvarez Miranda; Dating the Tiwanaku State by Szymon Augustyniak; Arte Rupestre del Rio Grande, Cuenca del Rio Limari, Norte Chico, Chile; La Revista de Codpa (Altos de Arica) de 1772-73; Recursos Hidricos Altoandinos, Estrategias de Desarrollo Economico y Proyectos de Riego: Tarapaca, 1880-1930; El Mundo Andino, Poblacion, Medio Ambiente y Economia de John V. Murra; etc. 
Price: 10.94 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Santuarios de Altura en la Region de la Laguna Brava in CHUNGARA  Revista De Antropologia Chilena - Volume 35, No. 2 (2003), Cologero M. Santoro Vargas
14 Cologero M. Santoro Vargas Santuarios de Altura en la Region de la Laguna Brava in CHUNGARA Revista De Antropologia Chilena - Volume 35, No. 2 (2003)
Arica, Chile Universidad de Tarapaca 2003 First Edition Paperback Near Fine 4to 11" - 13" tall 
Clean and tight in original glossy decorative wrappers. Published in 2003. Articles include: Bienes Fuerarios del Cementario Chinchorro Morro 1: Descripcion, Analisis e Interpretacion by Vivien Standen; Proposicion de Estilos para el Arte Rupestre de Valle de Putaendo by Andres Troncoso; Santuarios de Altura en la Region de la Laguna Brava by Maria Constanza Ceruti; testimonios en Triangulo: Personajes de la Nueva Coronica de Guaman Poma y del Manuscrito Quechua de Huarochiri en el Pleito sobre el Cacicazgo Principal de Mama (1588-1590); etc. 
Price: 10.94 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
Variaciones Culturales en el Valle de Lima durante la Ocupacion Incaica in CHUNGARA  Revista De Antropologia Chilena - Volume 36, No. 2 (2004), Cologero M. Santoro Vargas
15 Cologero M. Santoro Vargas Variaciones Culturales en el Valle de Lima durante la Ocupacion Incaica in CHUNGARA Revista De Antropologia Chilena - Volume 36, No. 2 (2004)
Arica, Chile Universidad de Tarapaca 2004 First Edition Paperback Near Fine 4to 11" - 13" tall 
Clean and tight in original glossy decorative wrappers. Articles include: Quebrada Tacahuay: Un Sitio Maritimo del Pleistoceno Tardio en la Costa Sur del Peru; Ocupaciones Humanas del Holoceno Tardio en Los Vilos (IV Region, Chile); Variaciones Culturales en el Valle de Lima durante la Ocupacion Incaica; El Ushnu Inka y la Organizacion del Espacio en los Principales Tampus de los Wamani de la Sierra Central del Chinchaysuyu; El Inka y el Poder como Problemas de la Arqueologia del Norte Grande de Chile; El Tawantinsuyu en Aconcagua (Chile Central); Reconfiguracion de un Esp[acio Sagrado: Los Inkas y la Piramide Pumapunku en Tiwanaku, Boliva; etc. 
Price: 10.94 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
INDIANS ON THE UPPER MISSOURI, Cumming, A. ; (Superintendant Indian Affairs)
16 Cumming, A. ; (Superintendant Indian Affairs) INDIANS ON THE UPPER MISSOURI
Washington, DC G.P.O. 1856 First Edition Paperback Very Good 8vo 
15 pages; Message from the President of the United States, transmitting A Report in regard to the expedition among the Indians on the Upper Missouri. Executive Document No. 65, 34th Congress, 1st Session. OCLC: 9102688 Omaha Reserve at Black Bird Hills, Pawnee, Poncas, Sioux, Yancton Sioux, Fort Pierre, Fort Clark, Arickarees, Yellos Stone River, Black Feet, etc. ; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
Price: 19.94 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
17 Dobie, J. Frank ON THE OPEN RANGE
Dallas Southwest Press 1931 Hardcover Very Good+ 8vo 
xii, 312 pages; Clean and tight in original blue cloth binding with decorative stamping in orange on front board. Pictorial endpapers depicting a western hat and bandanna and a hanging saddle. OCLC: 1344464 Tiny date stamped in upper left corner of ffep (Feb 14 '32) and small original bookseller's ticket on rear ep in the shape of a book "Methodist / Publishing / House / Books / Stationery, Gifts / Dallas" Faint toning to edges of eps from binding. Book measures about 1" thick. A nice bright example of this uncommon Dobie book (his third published). A confusing issue as it has the pictorial endpapers found on the First Edition (limited to 750 copies), and it lacks the statements regarding the school edition, but it is in the navy blue binding with the thinner paper. 
Price: 149.94 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
18 Eastman, Edwin SEVEN AND NINE YEARS AMONG THE CAMANCHES AND APACHES - AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY
Jersey City Clark Johnson 1873 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Very Good 8vo 
309 pages; Very light scattered foxing, original owner's 19th century bookplate (W. C. Babcock / Scott, N.Y. ), otherwise contents clean and tight in original orange cloth binding with titles and decorative stamping in black at spine and front board. Some light soiling and spotting to cloth binding, wear at spine ends. OVerall a quite nice example of this narrative of Indian captivity. Frontispiece of Mr. Eastman in native costume, plus seven additional full page illustrations and a couple in-text engravings at chapter heads. From the first chapter: "In these chapters I will detail the trials and sufferings of such as these [white captives of Native American tribes], believing that the experiences of my wife and myself, during our captivity among the Camanches and Apaches, will serve as a prototype of many similar cases." "... the tales of life-long suffering of the forlorn captives were scarcely ever known. Snatched ruthlessly from the bosom of their families, they were mourned for a time and then they, by slow degrees, faded from the memory of their friends and relatives, and when thought of at all, it was as of those dead." Despite the author's marvelous rhetoric, the contents of this book comprise a literary concoction constructed from the author's imagination -- "The Torture," "The Buffalo Hunt," "The Escape" -- all fictional. Eastman's motivation for producing this book was to encourage sales of his patent medicine called Dr. Clark Johnson's Indian Blood Syrup, for which there is a one page ad at the end of the text. ; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
Price: 34.94 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
19 Eastman, Seth ; (artist) ; R. Hinshelwood (engraver) ; Henry Rowe Schoolcraft Defeat of Vasques d'Ayllon by the Chicoreans [ Hand-colored steel engraving ]
Philadelphia Lippincott, Granbo & Co. 1853 First Edition Engraving Very Good 8" X 5 1/2" 
Steel Engraving; 1 pages; Dramatic 19th century hand-colored steel engraving of Vázquez de Ayllón and his men battling the Chicorean Indians on the coast of the American southeast in 1526. Image measures 8" X 5 1/2" (14" x 11" matted). Matted in white stock with clear mylar. A sharp clear engraving, skillfully hand-coloured. This engraving is from Henry Rowe Schoolcraft's Historical and Statistical Information Respecting the History, Condition, and Prospects of the Indian Tribes of the United States, Vol 3., 1853. Lucas Vázquez de Ayllón (c. 1475 - 1526) was a Spanish explorer who in 1526 established the short-lived San Miguel de Gualdape colony, the first European attempt at a settlement in what is now the continental United States. Commanding a fleet of six vessels with 600 colonists, Vázquez de Ayllón and his group landed in Winyah Bay, near present-day Georgetown, South Carolina, on September 29, 1526. After considerable scouting about, in October 1526, they established the short-lived colony of San Miguel de Gualdape, the first European settlement in the present United States, near present-day Sapelo Sound in Georgia. Ayllón's colony survived only about three months, devastated by hunger, disease, and troubles with the local natives. Of the 600, 150 survivors made their way back to Hispaniola. "...this illustration ... represents major colonial episodes from a supposedly alien vantage point: we look from the shore at the approaching European longboat; we see a battle won by Natives" [Narrating the Landscape by M. N. Johnson] 
Price: 24.94 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
 
WILLIAM SAWYER AND OTHERS - Committee on Private Lands, Edgerton, Mr
20 Edgerton, Mr WILLIAM SAWYER AND OTHERS - Committee on Private Lands
Washington, DC U. S. House of Representatives 1852 First Edition Self Wrappers Very Good 8vo 
4 pages; Report 98, 37th Congress, 2nd Session. Regarding the grants to members of the Miami Indian tribe and their heirs of tracts of land on each side of the St. Mary's River by the Treaty of Greenville in 1795; the subsequent 1826 treaty providing that the US repurchase some of said granted land in 1795 and in 1818, etc... ; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
Price: 9.94 USD
Add to Shopping Cart
 
  1  2 3  NEXT >  


Questions, comments, or suggestions
Please write to nicebooks@ix.netcom.com
Copyright©2017. All Rights Reserved.
Powered by ChrisLands.com

 

 

cookie