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History and Area Studies

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A HISTORY OF THE RENCOUNTER AT DRUMCLOG AND BATTLE  AT BOTHWELL BRIDGE IN THE MONTH OF JUNE 1679 with folding engraved frontispiece, Aiton, William
1 Aiton, William A HISTORY OF THE RENCOUNTER AT DRUMCLOG AND BATTLE AT BOTHWELL BRIDGE IN THE MONTH OF JUNE 1679 with folding engraved frontispiece
Hamilton W. D. Borthwick and Co. 1821 First Edition Hardcover Good 8vo 8" - 9" tall 
131 pages; With an account of what is correct, and What is Fictitious in the Tales of my Landlord, respecting these engagements, and Reflections on Politcal Subjects . OCLC: 6386611 The Battle of Drumclog is celebrated by some in Scotland as a victory for religious freedom over the oppressive policies of the contemporary government. Folding frontispiece plate and text block clean and tightly stitched, front board detached, backstrip and ffep lacking. Excellent candidate for rebacking. ; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
Price: 149.95 USD
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Journal Historique Et Politique Des Principaux Événements Des Différentes Cours de L'Europe  including "Traite de paix entre l'Angleterre & les Caraïbes de l'isle Saint-Vincent", Anonymous
2 Anonymous Journal Historique Et Politique Des Principaux Événements Des Différentes Cours de L'Europe including "Traite de paix entre l'Angleterre & les Caraïbes de l'isle Saint-Vincent"
Genève [but probably Paris] Ch.- J. Panckoucke 1773 First Edition Hardcover Very Good 12mo 
On offer here is an attractive volume in 18th century full calf, bound in the French style, (flat spine with floral tools in gilt, red label lettered in gilt, marbled endpapers, edges decoratively stained red). The volume in which these interesting numbers of the now-scarce 'Journal Historique Et Politique Des Principaux Événements Des Différentes Cours de L'Europe' is in a handsome contemporary binding which shows only minor rubbing -- mostly along the hinges, apart from some moderate fraying and loss at the corners and erosion of the top cap of the spine, exposing the headband. The original swirl-marbled endpapers are intact and the inner hinges are tight and secure; the sewing is sound and tight throughout. There are scattered brown marks and paper flaws, reflecting the mediocre quality of the paper selected for this journal, which was hardly expected to last for 240 years. This volume contains issues 10-18 of the interesting periodical "Journal Historique Et Politique Des Principaux Événements Des Différentes Cours de L'Europe," covering events of April-June of 1773. This journal was published every 10 days for the active Parisian publisher and bookseller Charles-Joseph Panckoucke. One of the "différentes Cours de L'Europe" in which events were covered extensively was London, with pages of details of goings on in England and its colonies offered in each issue. There is an unusually detailed account, with full text (in French) of a significant treaty signed by a representative of King George III: "Traite de paix entre l'Angleterre & les Caraïbes de l'isle Saint-VIncent." This appears on pp. 45-48 of Numero 12 -- issued 30 Avril, 1773. The treaty is presented as having been agreed to on the 17th "de ces mois," and so it is very much in the category of breaking news. This treaty is now fairly (but undeservedly) obscure, but the situation it attempted to settle grew out of one famous treaty, from ten years before and it proved to be a fascinating precursor to another more famous treaty, signed ten years later. In one of the lesser re-assignments of the territories of the world effected by the 1763 Treaty of Paris at the conclusion of the Seven Years' War -- Britain was awarded the right to rule over the Caribbean island of Saint Vincent. The island's history, of course, is much older; native American Arawak and Carib tribes settled over several centuries on a number of islands in the Lesser Antilles including St.Vincent. The Arawaks arrived around 100AD, and the Caribs about a thousand years later. The Caribs, more organized and aggressive, subdued and absorbed the culture of the Arawaks. Shortly after the first British claim on Saint Vincent in 1627, two Dutch ships carrying captured Nigerians destined for slavery were shipwrecked in 1635 off the coast of St. Vincent. Some of the Africans were able to swim ashore and find shelter in the Carib villages. This population of Africans and their descendants was augmented over the years, including in 1675 when a ship carrying British settlers and their slaves was shipwrecked between St. Vincent and Bequia. Only the slaves survived the shipwreck and they also came to live and mix with the native mixed Carib-Arawak population. A certain number of escaped slaves from nearby Barbados, Grenada and St. Lucia also added to the African-Carib population. After some friction, and even wars, eventually the native Caribs and the newer African arrivals merged and blended their cultures. British settlers distinguished them as "Black Caribs" and "Red (or yellow) Caribs. The "Black" people so-designated by outsiders preferred to call themselves Garifuna. Throughout some of this period, there were French settlers who arrived with the intention of making their living as planters. They seemed to get along with the native population with less friction, but the British land owners seemed united in their desire to form large plantations and to run the Caribs off the most desireable land. They tried to buy the land, tried military action with the minor forces available, but the "Black" Caribs resisted both efforts. The British raised the stakes by sending Major General William Dalrymple, with troops borrowed from around the Caribbean and augmented by two regiments which were sent from North America (Dalrymple himself had been dispatched from Boston, where he had technically been in command of troops involved in the Boston Massacre, although he himself had not been present). Despite his best efforts, Dalrymple was unable to subdue the resisting Caribs, led by the now-legendary Chief Joseph Chatoyer -- who knew the windward side of the islands and the hills far better than any of their combantants. In February, opponents of the Government of Lord North raised objections in Parliament, and obtained votes which compelled the British Government to end the fighting and secure peace on the best terms possible. The French language text offered here appears to be a word for word version of the 24 articles of the English treaty published in the 'Saint Vincent Gazette' of 27 February 1773. One article, number VIII, is of extraordinary interest concerning Slavery and the trade (which would continue in the British possessions for nearly another sixty years). The heart of this article requires that Runaway Slaves in the possession of the Caribs are to be given up, that efforts must be made to discover and capture others, and it must be agreed that no future efforts to encourage, receive or harbour other slaves shall be made, under the penalty of fortiture of lands. Finally, it was stated that removal of Slaves from the Island constituted a Capital crime. The Caribs were required to pledge allegiance to King George III, but were made British subjects (which gave legal standing to enforce article VIII, of course). In return, the British ceded a well-defined portion of the Island to the Caribs -- (called the prettiest and most fertile part of the land by at least one subsequent scholar). Thus concluded the first Anglo-Carib War. This treaty did not endure for the ages... During three days in June of 1779, French ships fighting on behalf of the Revolutionaries in (North) America quickly took possession of Saint Vincent (with the assistance of Joseph Chatoyer and the "Black Caribs"). But in the Treaty of Versailles which was an ancillary treaty to the Treaty of Paris 1783 by which Britain also recognized the end of the American Revolutionary War saw the British restored as sovereigns over Saint Vincent. Relations between the British and their once-again subjects, the Caribs, disintegrated. The situation brought about a second Anglo-Carib war (1794-6), once again led by Joseph Chatoyer. As in the first war, the Caribs gave the British forces all they could manage for over a year, but after the death in battle of Chatoyer on March 14, 1795, the end seemed inevitable, although fighting raged throughout St. Vincent over the next year with both sides sustaining heavy losses. The final battle took place at Vigie on June 10th, 1796. After a night of arduous fighting the Caribs approached the British with a truce flag. The victorious British then did a remarkable thing, which has repercussions lasting throughout the Caribbean and extending to South and North America through the present time. They sorted the 5000 Caribs who surrendered, separating the darkest skinned individuals, and those with the most "African" features, from the "Yellow Caribs." This darkest majority of the so-called Black Caribs were first sent to Balliceaux in the Grenadines and then on to Bequia. Eventually, in 1797 the survivors were transported hundreds of miles to the island of Roatan off the Honduran coast in Central America. This extraordinary settlement has permanently affected the modern populations of Belize, Guatemala, Nicaragua, and Honduras. The 1773 treaty offered in its French version here, may have become moot in just over six years, but it will stand forever as the first time that Britain was compelled by military force to negociate a treaty as equals with indiginous citizens of the New World. The incident has lasting imporance to African American history, and the lamentable history of the Slave Trade. (There is even a painting which records the negotiations for the treaty -- commissioned of the itinerant artist Agostino Brunias by Sir William Young, a major landowner on Saint Vincent, who became governor of Dominica; lithographs based on the painting were sold). Of course, there is much other news from all over Europe in these pages, including an interesting account from the future United States with details of the grant of land to Phineas Lyman and some of his fellow veterans of the French and Indian Wars. General Lyman was the most experienced American soldier of the period prior to the Revolution. He moved to England after 1762 and spent the next nine years petitioning for a grant of land in the newly established colony of West Florida. A tract near Natchez (now Mississippi) was granted by royal charter in 1772. Lyman led a band of settlers to the region in 1773 -- (see pp. 42-3 of Numero 11, 20 Avril, 1773). There is much in these pages about the troubles of the East India Company, and the Wilkes affair, as well. And, finally, there is an account of a significant incident in the tensions which moved events towards the American Revolution. Colonial Governor of Massachusetts Thomas Hutchinson, in a speech to the assembly, argued that either the colony was wholly subject to Parliament, or that it was effectively independent. The Boston Provincial Assembly's response, authored by John Adams, Samuel Adams, and Joseph Hawley, countered that the colonial charter granted autonomy -- and was described in an account on pages 39-40 of Numero 13, 10 Mai, 1773. 
Price: 950.00 USD
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SUGGESTIONS FOR LEAGUE SPEAKERS - Speech material for League of Nations addresses, Anonymous
3 Anonymous SUGGESTIONS FOR LEAGUE SPEAKERS - Speech material for League of Nations addresses
New York League To Enforce Peace 1919 Pamphlet Very Good 12mo 
71 & [1] pages; Publisher's tan printed wrappers, textured with a surface to resemble cloth. Library stamp on front cover, minor marks at top and bottom (from previously having been tied into a bundle with string or twine) -- generally very good. A collection of "talking points" for the use of speakers aiming to sway public opinion towards the difficult goal of ratification of Wilson's proposed League of Nations by the U.S. Senate after the first Wprld War. The last section contains helpful quotes in favor of the League by various notables, including former President Theodore Roosevelt, who died just before this pamphlet was published. Socially, this is quite interesting, as the national debate over ratification for the League of Nations is probably the last great U.S. issue argued and decided without a major role being played by Radio. So, a whole phalanx of speakers might be expected to argue a cause like this before a large number of local groups. Within a few short years, such gatherings and their influence would be supplemented, and finally superceded, by radio, and later, television. In any event, issue-oriented background material for speakers like the present pamphlet was prepared for a small number of activists, and largely consumed in the struggle, and the surviving copies quickly abandoned once the cause was decided. This is now quite scarce, after nearly 90 years. See OCLC 4175752.; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
Price: 19.95 USD
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THE GENEVA PRELIMINARY MEETING of the UNIVERSAL RELIGIOUS PEACE CONFERENCE, Anonymous
4 Anonymous THE GENEVA PRELIMINARY MEETING of the UNIVERSAL RELIGIOUS PEACE CONFERENCE
New York WCIPTR 1928 First Edition Pamphlet Very Good+ 8vo 
36 pages; September 1928. Publication No. 6. Near Fine in original blue wrappers. Frontispiece photograph. OCLC: 14957599; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
Price: 34.95 USD
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THE NEAR EAST FROM WITHIN, Anonymous
5 Anonymous THE NEAR EAST FROM WITHIN
London Cassell and Company 1915 First Edition Hardcover Very Good 8vo 
viii, 256 pages; Clean and tight in original navy blue cloth with gilt lettering and gilt image of crescent moon and star. Clean and tight in original blue cloth binding with gilt lettering and the image of a crescent moon and star; cloth mildly rubbed at spine ends. Frontispiece photograph of Peter I of Servia, 12 addition photogravure portraits of various leaders in Servia, Eypt; Roumania; Greece, Bulgaria, etc. Chapter headings include: Sultan Abdul Hamid; Life in Constantinople; Sultan Mohammed V; Russian influence in Constantinople; Sheikh-ul-Islam; Khedive Abbas Hilmi; Emperor William II; German Emperor at Konophischt; Rival Inflences in Greece, Tsar Ferdinand of Bulgaria; Persuading of Turkey; Egypt in the Balance, etc. OCLC: 167110 From a contemporary review: "The writer of this book has until recently, occupied a very high diplomatic position, as the intimacy of the relevations made will testify. For this reason the author must remain anonymous." Somehow I suspect this last statement was a bit of misdirection and this work originated in the Foreign Office. 
Price: 99.95 USD
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AN INTRODUCTION INTO LAMAISM - The Mystical Buddhism of Tibet, Anuruddha, R. P.
6 Anuruddha, R. P. AN INTRODUCTION INTO LAMAISM - The Mystical Buddhism of Tibet
Hoshiarpur Vishveshvaranand Vedic Research institute 1959 First Edition Hardcover Very Good- in Very Good- dust jacket 8vo 8" - 9" tall 
xvi, 212 pages; Clean and tight in original printed boards with brown cloth spine in chipped, edgeworn dustjacket. Dustjacket flaps fixed to inner boards. Lamaism the Mahayana form of Buddhism of Tibet and Mongolia. 
Price: 14.95 USD
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THE WORKS OF FRANCIS BACON, LORD CHANCELLOR OF ENGLAND in 16 Volumes Complete, A New Edition, Bacon, Francis; Basil Montagu
7 Bacon, Francis; Basil Montagu THE WORKS OF FRANCIS BACON, LORD CHANCELLOR OF ENGLAND in 16 Volumes Complete, A New Edition
London William Pickering 1825 New Edition Leather Bound Very Good+ 8vo 
Sixteen Volumes bound as 17 (Volume 16 bound in two parts), published consecutively from 1825 to 1834. Tan half calf over marbled boards with red and black title labels at spines with gilt lettering and extensive gilt tooling at spines; marbled endpapers. Bindings in very nice condition with some light rubbing. Volume 3 has some wear at head of spine, still quite attractive (see images); Volume 16, II has a scrape to leather on rear board. Engraved portrait frontispiece and facsimile letter in Volume 1; folding plan of 'Advancement of Learning' in Volume 2; engraved frontispiece portrait of Bacon in Volume 4; engraved frontispiece of St. Michael's Church in Volume 5; Engraved frontispiece of Monument to Lord Bacon in Volume 6; Frontispiece in Volume 7 has three images of Gorhameury; frontispiece in Volume 8; frontispiece facsimile letter in Volume 9. Volumes 1-3 and Volumes 9-11 were printed by "Thomas White, Printer,/Johnson's Court;" Volumes 4 - 8 printed by "Thomas White, Printer,/ Crane Court;" Volumes 12-16 printed by "C. Whittingham, Tooks Court/ Chancery Lane". Francis Bacon, 1st Viscount St. Alban (1561 – 1626) was an English philosopher, statesman, scientist, jurist and author. He served both as Attorney General and Lord Chancellor of England. After he left the political arena, he remained extremely influential through his writings, particularly his work on natural philosophy and the scientifi. Bacon has been called the creator of empiricism; introducing and popularising inductive methodologies for scientific inquiry. Additional shipping charge for this heavy multi-volume set. ; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
Price: 1649.95 USD
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SKETCHES OF UNIVERSAL HISTORY - Sacred and Profane, From the Creation of the World to the Year 1818 of the Christian Era, ... extended to the year 1822, Butler, Frederick
8 Butler, Frederick SKETCHES OF UNIVERSAL HISTORY - Sacred and Profane, From the Creation of the World to the Year 1818 of the Christian Era, ... extended to the year 1822
Hartford Oliver D. Cooke 1822 Fourth Edition Hardcover Very Good- 12mo 7" - 7½" tall 
412 pages; Text and plates unmarked and tight in original full leather binding with gilt at spine (crazed), rubbed at extremeties and edges of spine. Quite a charming early 19th century American binding. Former owner's name in pencil on rear endpaper, "The End" written in ink on last page of text, , scattered foxing, one signature protrudes slightly, lacks ffep. Frontispiece engraving depicts Nebuchadnezzar's Vision of the Image; additional full page plates include: Death of Cesar, William Tell, Discovery of America, Inauguration of President Washington, Death of Lews XVI, Conflagration of Moscow. Butler's metahistory begins with Creation and the Deluge and moves slowly through Western history up to the burning of Moscow, the restoration of Louis XVIII to the throne in France and Napoleon's exile to St. Helena. There is a Table listing the Sovereigns of various European nations and the Presidents of the United States followed by a detailed Table of Contents. 
Price: 44.95 USD
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9 Calderwood, Ivan E SEQUEL ... DAYS OF UNCLE DAVE'S FISH HOUSE Vinalhaven Seafarers are Recalled
Rockland Courier-Gazette 1972 First Edition Hardcover Very Good in Very Good dust jacket 4to 11" - 13" tall Signed by Author
Autograph; 266 pages; Clean and tight in original binding in edgeworn dustjacket with small closed tear at top edge of front fold (now in protective mylar cover), some minor foxing to top edge. Quite a nice example of this book of informative and enthralling legends of Vinalhaven island in Penobscot Bay, Maine from its earliest settlers, through the granite era and the fishery and lobstering age which continues through today. ; Signed by Author; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
Price: 24.95 USD
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REMARQUES SUR LES AFFAIRES DU MOMENT, Chateaubriand, [Francois Rene] De ; [1768-1848]
10 Chateaubriand, [Francois Rene] De ; [1768-1848] REMARQUES SUR LES AFFAIRES DU MOMENT
Paris Chez Le Normant 1818 First Edition Very Good 
8vo. 2 preliminary leaves (half title and title) & 36 pp. Disbound, but complete. With small stab-holes in the gutters of the leaves from previous stab-sewing. ; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
Price: 74.95 USD
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11 Chen Po-ta Notes on Mao Tse-tung's "Report of an Investigation into the Peasant Movement in Hunan"
Peking Foreign Languages Press 1954 First Edition Paperback Very Good 12mo 
62 pages; Minor bump at head of spine, otherwise clean and tight in original printed wrappers. OCLC 252249355 "The present English translation of ChenPo-ta's Notes on Mao Tse-tung's "Report onan Investigation of the Peasant Movement inHunan" has been made from the Chinese text, third edition, published by the People's Publishing House, Peking, in November 1953.The footnotes have been added by the editor." [Statement on the copyright page] "This article was written as a reply to the carping criticisms both inside and outside the Party then being levelled at the peasants' revolutionary struggle. Comrade Mao Tse-tung spent thirty-two days in Hunan Province making an investigation and wrote this report in order to answer these criticisms." [From the Selected Works of Mao Tse-tung, Foreign Languages Press, Peking, 1967] 
Price: 19.96 USD
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The Biographies of Madame de Stael and Madame Roland, Child, Mrs. ; [Lydia Maria Child 1802-80]
12 Child, Mrs. ; [Lydia Maria Child 1802-80] The Biographies of Madame de Stael and Madame Roland
Boston Carter and Hendee 1832 First Edition; First Printing Hardcover Very Good 12mo 
Ladies' Family Library - 1 ; ix, 265 [1] pages; Publisher's smooth light brown cloth, flat spine with printed paper label. The spine has now toned to a pleasant shade of tan, there are a couple of narrow chips to the right side of the long label (with loss of one letter at bottom), and just minor points of light wear at the tip of the spine at the top. Diffuse foxing to the plain endpapers, title page, and scattered throughout -- as is typical of American paper of the time. Page edges untrimmed (the half title has a small tear at the fore-edge, otherwise not yet opened at the top edge to an adjacent front blank). There is a faint pencil signature "H. Little / 1845" on the front free endpaper, otherwise, no other marks of any sort. The engraved frontispiece portrait of Madame De Stael has retained its original tissue guard (sized only to cover the image) -- but it has lightly offset onto the guard and through it to form an even fainter shadow on the title page. A landmark of early American writing for, by, and about, women.During a long life, Lydia Maria Child (1802 – 1880) was an abolitionist, a women's rights activist, an opponent of American expansionism, an Indian rights activist, a novelist, a journalist and a Unitarian. She had notable achievements in each of these diverse fields. She started life as Lydia Maria Francis in Medford, Massachusetts. Her older brother, Convers Francis, became a Unitarian minister. Lydia started her education at a local dame school and later studied at a women's seminary. Upon the death of her mother, she went to live with her older sister in Maine where she studied to be a teacher. During this time, her brother, Convers, a Unitarian minister, who had been educated at Harvard College and Seminary, saw to his younger sister’s education in literary classics. She read an article in the 'North American Review' suggesting that New England history offered much material to a prospective novelist. Inspired by this article, Lydia immediately wrote the first chapter of a novel entitled 'Hobomok'. Encouraged by her brother's praise, she finished it in six weeks, and 'Hobomok: A Tale of Early Times' was published (anonymously) in 1824. From this time until her death she wrote, and published, continually. Lydia Francis taught school until 1828, when she married Boston lawyer David Lee Child. Lydia Child and her husband began to associate themselves with the anti-slavery cause in 1831 through the personal influence and writings of William Lloyd Garrison. Mrs. Child was a also a committed women's rights activist, but did not believe significant progress for women could be made until after the abolition of slavery. But while she did postpone her political activism concerning women's rights, Lydia Child wrote and published a series of books intended for the use and edification of women -- 'The American Frugal Housewife,' a book of kitchen, economy and directions (1829; and eventually a 33rd edition appeared in 1855); and 'The Mother's Book' (1831), an early American instructional book on child rearing, subsequently published in editions in England and Germany. In 1832, she wrote this volume, intended to be the first of 'The Ladies' Family Library,' a series of biographies (which eventually extended to 5 volumes, 1832–1835). The first words to the Preface to this first volume makes Lydia Child's intentions clear - and she even is specific about the design and style of the physical appearance of her proposed volumes: "The object of the Ladies' Family Library is to furnish a series of volumes, which will suit the taste, and interst the feelings of women.... The volumes will be handsomely printed, each containing a good engraving. As the series will be numbered upon the outside, and not upon the title-page, purchasers can make such selections as they choose, and have them bound in whatever order they think proper." Indeed, there is an unsually large printed paper label mounted to the spine, which, along with the half title, is the only reference to a volume number for this first appearance of 'The Ladies' Family Library,' and Mrs. Child's suggestion that buyers might bind to their own taste and requirements was evidently taken up by most, as this early American trade cloth binding is now quite scarce, particularly in such fresh condition. 
Price: 149.95 USD
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13 Douglas, James ; [SIGNED] PASSING THOUGHTS
London Hamilton, Adams and Co. 1855 First Edition Hardcover Very Good Signed by Author
Autograph; 448 pages; Inscribed by the author on titlepage - Helen Robertson from James Douglas of Cavers Clean and tight in original blue cloth binding with decorative blindstamping, rubbed at edges. An interesting group of essays including the following: Goethe, Rousseau, Humboldt, Italy, Cousin and Eclecticism, Grecian History, France and Democracy, Britain and the World, The Moors of Spain, The History of England, Devotional Writers. ; Signed by Author; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
Price: 84.95 USD
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THE INTERNATIONAL POSITION OF TIBET, Government of the Dalai Lama
14 Government of the Dalai Lama THE INTERNATIONAL POSITION OF TIBET
n.p. Government of the Dalai Lama 1959 First Edition Paperback Very Good 4to 
(1), 63 ff. pages; Contents are clean and unmarked in original printed flexible board wrappers (binder style), with the title and date printed in red letters. Table of contents and 63 pages of text (printed on rectos only - mimeograph reproduction from a text produced on a typewriter). This publication, prepared in 1959 by the Government of the Dalai Lama details the historical relationship between Tibet and China from the 7th century to the situation in the 1950s and presents the arguments supporting their claim for Tibetan sovereignty. In 1959 the Dalai Lama sought support from the U.S. and other nations to recognize their government in exile and to bring their case for Tibetan sovereignty and against Chinese aggression before the United Nations. This publication is now rare. See OCLC: 230259625 [OCLC/WorldCat cites only two locations: Univ. of St. Andrews; and National Library of Australia]. It is necessary to distinguish between two 1959 publications under the same title. The more common (today) appears to be an octavo volume of 49 pages, which several sources attribute to the Central Electric Press in Delhi, India. [The British Library and Harvard University each has a copy in that smaller format; WorldCat details 10 locations of the 49 p. 8vo edition, under two OCLC numbers]. Our publication, a mimeographic duplication from a document produced on a typewriter, printed on rectos only of quarto sized sheets, has 63 leaves and an un-numbered first leaf ["Table of Contents"]. Technical limitations mean that our publication in quarto mimeographed format, is both more fragile by nature and less likely to have been issued in a large number of copies. Considering that the 14th Dalai Lama spent all but the first 90 days of 1959 residing in exile in Dharamshala, in the state of Himachal Pradesh in northern India, it is likely that our publication was produced there. Historical Context: In 1959, within days of the rapidly devolving March uprising in Lhasa, the Dalai Lama and his retinue fled Tibet with the help of the CIA's Special Activities Division. They crossed the border into India on 30 March 1959, and soon afterward, the Dalai Lama set up the Government of Tibet in Exile in Dharamshala, receiving support from the CIA including a personal annual stipend of $180,000 and other material support from at least 1959 until about 1974. (CIA support for the Government of the Dalai Lama in Exile and other potential Tibetan assets reportedly totalled about $1.7 million per annum). In April 1959 the Dalai Lama sent a message to the U.S. Government requesting that the U.S. formally recognize the Free Tibetan Government and that he encourage other nations to do so. Under Secretary of State C. Douglas Dillon advised President Eisenhower that the U.S. should "avoid taking any position which might encourage the Dalai Lama to seek international recognition." Despite considerable U.S. covert support of the Tibetans' efforts to oust the Chinese, the official U.S. position held that Tibet was an autonomous country under Chinese suzerainty. The State Department believed this position better served America's broader foreign policy interest viz. China and India. In fact, the Eisenhower administration (both the State Department and the CIA) restrained the Tibetans from presenting their case against Chinese aggression, instead skirting the political issues and treading the softer line of human rights violations and cultural oppression. The Tibetans finally enlisted Ireland and Malaya to request "The Question of Tibet" to be added to the U.N. agenda for its 14th session. Consequently, the United Nations' Resolution 1353 (XIV) on Tibet was passed in October 1959. This first U.N. resolution on Tibet did not address the sovereignty issue, but voiced their "grave concern at the continued violation of the fundamental rights and freedoms of Tibetans" and calling for "respect of the fundamental human rights of the Tibetan people and for their distinctive cultural and religious life." For an interesting exposition of this era of Tibetan diplomacy, see "Tibet Issue at the UN: a case study in informal diplomacy, (1950-65)" by Kalzang Diki Bhutia. Either directly or indirectly, this publication was made possible by support from the CIA; it is a fascination sidelight of history that the official US government position was not in alignment with this text, and also, that no copy of our rare publication seems to have survived in any institutional library in the USA. 
Price: 750.00 USD
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THE PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE OF THE MONROE DOCTRINE, Hall, Arnold Bennett
15 Hall, Arnold Bennett THE PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE OF THE MONROE DOCTRINE
New York The Institute of International Education 1920 First Edition Paperback Very Good 8vo 8" - 9" tall 
International Relations Clubs. Syllabus No. II; 25 pages; Contents clean and tight in original printed wrappers. Former owner's name at top of front wrapper - F.X. Dwyer. Francis Xavier Dwyer was co-author of a widely used textbook: "Introduction to the Study of Law," by Edmund M. Morgan and Francis X. Dwyer, and was a librarian at the Law Library of Harvard University and later for decades at the Law Library of Library of Congress. OCLC: 15025753 
Price: 9.95 USD
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TALK OF PROPAGANDA, Harvey, Ian
16 Harvey, Ian TALK OF PROPAGANDA
London Falcon Press 1947 First Edition Hardcover Near Fine in Very Good dust jacket 
116 pages; Clean and tight in original binding; dustjacket somewhat faded at spine. Quite a nice example of this uncommon book on propaganda. OCLC: 2023143 ; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
Price: 9.95 USD
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EDWARD ARMSTRONG 1846-1928, Hutton, W. H
17 Hutton, W. H EDWARD ARMSTRONG 1846-1928
London Humphrey Milford Amen House 1928 First Edition Thus Paperback Very Good 8vo 
10 pages; A memorial tribue From the Proceedings of the British Academy. Volume XIV. Printed by John Johnson at the University Press, Oxford. OCLC: 33956882 Edward Armstrong FBA (1846 – 1928) was an English historian educated at Bradfield College and Exeter College, Oxford, and then became a Fellow of The Queen's College, Oxford. Armstrong wrote books on Charles V, Elisabeth Farnese, and Lorenzo de' Medici. He also contributed to the The Cambridge Modern History and the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica.Armstrong served as warden of Bradfield College from 1920 to 1925.; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
Price: 5.95 USD
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18 Keith, Charles P CHRONICLES OF PENNSYLVANIA FROM THE ENGLISH REVOLUTION TO THE PEACE OF AIX-LA-CHAPELLE, 1688-1748 - TWO VOLUME SET
Philadelphia Patterson and White 1917 First Edition Hardcover Very Good 
vii, 456; 457-981 pages; Complete in two volumes. Two large octavo volumes - clean and tight in blue cloth bindings with gilt lettering, gilt bright at spine of Vol. 1, but faded from spine of Vol. 2. Contains chapters on Royal Charters; acquisition and Distribution of Land; The Red Neighbors [Indians]; Government under the Frame of 1683; Religious Dissention; Government by Penn's Friends; The AntiProprietary Party; The Funding of Penn's Debts; The Germans; The Irish and their Kirk; Final Struggle for Judicial Rights; Frontier and Metropolis; John, Thomas and Richard Penn; Quaker Control of the Assembly; The War of the Austrian succession, etc; Experience the pleasure of reading and appreciating this actual printed item. It has its own physical history that imbues it with a character lacking in ephemeral electronic renderings. 
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STUDIES IN FRONTIER HISTORY  Collected Papers 1928-1958, Lattimore, Owen
19 Lattimore, Owen STUDIES IN FRONTIER HISTORY Collected Papers 1928-1958
London Oxford University Press 1962 First Edition Hardcover Near Fine in Near Fine dust jacket 8vo 8" - 9" tall 
568 pages; Clean and tight in original green cloth binding in dustjacket. These are the collected essays and other contributions to Asisan Studies written by Lattimore over the years. The book is divided into six sections: The Inner Asian Frontier, Sinkiang, Mongolia, Manchuria, China, National Minorities, and Social History. Professor Lattimore is one of the few Westerners who speaks Chinese, Mongolian and Russian and one of the very few who have travelled extensively through the desert edges and mountain ranges of the Chinese Frontier. The central aspect of his study has been his developing concept of pastoral nomadism. Owen Lattimore (1900 – 1989) was an American author and influential scholar of China and Central Asia, especially Mongolia. Born in the U.S. Lattimore was raised in China where his parents were teachers at a University. After his later education in Europe, Lattimore worked first for a newspaper and then for a British import/export related business. This gave him the opportunity to travel extensively in China and time to study Chinese with an old-fashioned Confucian scholar. A turning point in his life was negotiating the passage of a trainload of wool through the lines of two battling warlords early in 1925, which led him to follow the caravans across Inner Mongolia to the end of the line in Xinjiang. In 1934, Lattimore was appointed editor of the journal Pacific Affairs, which he edited from Beijing. The Lattimore left China in 1938. In the early post-war period of McCarthyism and the Red Scare, Lattimore was accused of being "the top Russian espionage agent in the United States." The charges were not substantiated, but they did bring to light Lattimore's sympathetic statements about Stalin and the Soviet Union, which eventually undermined his academic and consulting career. 
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NATIONALISM AND REVOLUTION IN MONGOLIA with a translation from the Mongol of Sh. Nachukdorji's Life of Sukebatur, Lattimore, Owen ; Urgungge Onon [SIGNED]
20 Lattimore, Owen ; Urgungge Onon [SIGNED] NATIONALISM AND REVOLUTION IN MONGOLIA with a translation from the Mongol of Sh. Nachukdorji's Life of Sukebatur
Leiden E.J. Brill 1955 First Edition Hardcover Very Good+ in Very Good- dust jacket 8vo 8" - 9" tall 
Autograph; x, 186 pages; Clean and tight in original light green cloth binding with gilt lettering in edgeworn dustjacket. Inscribed and SIGNED by one of the authors - "For my best friend XXXXXX / from / Urgungge Onon." The recipient was a C.I.A. operative in Tibet and Mongolia in the 1950s. Owen Lattimore (1900 – 1989) was an American author and influential scholar of China and Central Asia, especially Mongolia. Born in the U.S. Lattimore was raised in China where his parents were teachers at a University. After his later education in Europe, Lattimore worked first for a newspaper and then for a British import/export related business. This gave him the opportunity to travel extensively in China and time to study Chinese with an old-fashioned Confucian scholar. A turning point in his life was negotiating the passage of a trainload of wool through the lines of two battling warlords early in 1925, which led him to follow the caravans across Inner Mongolia to the end of the line in Xinjiang. In 1934, Lattimore was appointed editor of the journal Pacific Affairs, which he edited from Beijing. The Lattimore left China in 1938. In the early post-war period of McCarthyism and the Red Scare, Lattimore was accused of being "the top Russian espionage agent in the United States." The charges were not substantiated, but they did bring to light Lattimore's sympathetic statements about Stalin and the Soviet Union, which eventually undermined his academic and consulting career. ; Signed by One Author 
Price: 74.95 USD
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