SOME REMINISCENCES

By: Phillips, Lionel ; [Mrs. Hennen Jennings' copy]

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Autograph; xl, 296 pages; Contents clean and secure in original blue cloth binding with gilt lettering at spine and front board. OCLC 843037330 Inscribed on ffep -- "To / my old friend / Mrs. Hennen Jennings / with Kind greetings / from / The Author" Mary Coleman Jennings was the wife of James Hennen Jennings (1854-1920), a mining engineer, born at Hawesville, KY. After attending private schools in London and Derbyshire, England, Jennings returned to Kentucky and set up a lumber business, but soon wanted to further his engineeering education. He graduated from the Lawrence Scientific School of Harvard University in 1877 with the degree C.E. Jennings then headed West and worked in gold and quicksilver mines in California for the next ten years. In 1887 he went to Venezuela for another mining job. Finally, his talents as an innovative mining engineer, took him to South Africa. During 1889-1905 he was consulting engineer of H. Eckstein, in Johannesburg, and Wemher Beit, in London. Jennings was chiefly responsible for the development and expansion of their mines, employing the most technologically advanced methods and equipment available in the day. In the rough and tumble of South Africa, he managed to keep out of John Hays Hammond's conspiracy to overthrow Kruger's government and to earn a fortune (the equivalent of about 10 million pounds in 2014) before he returned to America in 1905. Sir Lionel Phillips, 1st Baronet (1855 – 1936) was a British-born South African financier, mining magnate and politician. He was one of three sons and the family was lower middle-class, thus his early formal education was very limited. He commenced working for his father as a bookkeeper at the age of 14 but soon left the business and ventured out on his own, joining a firm of London diamond-sorters. Hearing of the discovery of large diamond deposits in Kimberley, he decided to seek his fortune and emigrate to South Africa. He arrived at the Kimberley diamond fields in 1875, having walked most of the way there from Cape Town, and worked for Joseph Benjamin Robinson as a diamond sorter; he fleetingly ran a newspaper - The Independent - and later became a mine manager. He soon went into partnership with Alfred Beit and made and lost his first fortune in Kimberley with investments in the diamond industry. Cecil Rhodes and Alfred Beit befriended him and in 1889 he became a mining consultant at the gold mining concern Corner House to Hermann Eckstein & Co., in which Beit was the majority shareholder. Phillips was described as "wiry" and having "immense energy and tenacity of purpose" – he had hoped once to be the manager of De Beers, but Beit offered £2,500 a year, expenses paid and 10 per cent of the profits from managing the firm's interests in the Nellmapius Syndicate. Phillips arrived in Johannesburg at a chaotic time, with Jules Porgès on the verge of retiring and the Johannesburg share market in turmoil after a potential disaster had been discovered in the mines.Within a short while, Phillips became a leading player in the mining industry, as well as an active supporter of the Uitlander movement against the Transvaal Republic government. In 1885, he married Florence Ortlepp. He succeeded Eckstein as chairman of the Chamber of Mines in 1892. The Phillips' house, Hohenheim, was built where the Johannesburg General Hospital presently stands, after Florence had suggested the laying out of the suburb Parktown, to escape the dust problem created by the ever-growing mine dumps south of the city. Hohenheim was the first mansion built in Parktown, designed by Frank Emley in 1892, and later became the home of Sir Percy FitzPatrick, author and mining financier. In 1909, the family moved to Villa Arcadia. Phillips made his political affiliations clear in a speech at the inauguration of the Chamber of Mines' new offices in November 1895. After the abortive Jameson Raid, Phillips' measure of involvement in the Reformers' movement was revealed; the Reform Committee was a 56-member committee representing the grievances of Johannesburgers to the Paul Kruger government. Phillips had awaited the outcome of the raid in Johannesburg, and was prepared to take part in the expected uprising. On receiving news of the raid's failure, Phillips handed himself over to the authorities on 10 January 1896 and pleaded guilty. He and the other ringleaders, including Colonel Frank Rhodes (brother of Cecil) and John Hays Hammond, were initially sentenced to death, but after six months of imprisonment most were reprieved by President Kruger and each fined £25 000. Phillips was cautioned to refrain from dabbling in politics on pain of exile, a warning which he ignored by publishing an inflammatory article in the Nineteenth Century, resulting in his being banished from the Transvaal by State Attorney Jan Smuts – Jameson and his fellow raiders were sent to London by Kruger, there to be tried by a Crown court, much to the embarrassment of all involved, while Rhodes was forced to resign as chairman of the British South Africa Company and as Cape Prime Minister. Phillips settled at and almost completely rebuilt Tylney Hall in Hampshire, England, importing a sixteenth-century ceiling from the Grimation Palace in Florence. He remained there until the end of the Boer War, when he was persuaded by Alfred Beit and Wernher to return to Johannesburg in the interests of the firm. He was once again elected chairman of the Chamber of Mines and, in 1910, was elected to the first Union House of Assembly as a member of the Unionist Party. He was regarded as the authority on South African gold mining, and the undisputed leader and spokesman for the mining industry. [wikipedia] Mary Jennings was the wife of James Hennen Jennings (1854-1920), a mining engineer, born at Hawesville, KY. After attending private schools in London and Derbyshire, England, Jennings returned to Kentucky and set up a lumber business, but soon wanted to further his engineeering education. He graduated from the Lawrence Scientific School of Harvard University in 1877 with the degree C.E. Jennings then headed West and worked in gold and quicksilver mines in California for the next ten years. In 1887 he went to Venezuela for another mining job. Finally, his talents as an innovative mining engineer, took him to South Africa. During 1889-1905 he was consulting engineer of H. Eckstein, in Johannesburg, and Wemher Beit, in London. In the rough and tumble of South Africa, he managed to keep out of John Hays Hammond's conspiracy to overthrow Kruger's government and and to earn a fortune (the equivalent of about 10 million pounds in 2014) before he returned to America in 1905. ; Signed by Author

Title: SOME REMINISCENCES

Author Name: Phillips, Lionel ; [Mrs. Hennen Jennings' copy]

Categories: Signed and Association Copies, Political Science, Biography and Autobiography, African Studies,

Edition: First Edition

Publisher: London, Hutchinson & Co.: (1924)

Binding: Hardcover

Book Condition: Very Good

Inscription: Signed by Author

Size: 8vo

Seller ID: 42405

Keywords: South Africa Gold Mining Transvaal Jameson's Raid Kimberley Diamonds Rand Barons Rand Lords